Preservation Bumper Stickers

Something fun for your Monday!  A historic preservation bumper sticker, just in time for road trip season. You know you want one – or rather, your car wants one!  After I lost Derby and my preservation bumper stick from Mary Washington, Vinny went on a search for a look-a-like bumper sticker. Without luck, he decided to create a bumper sticker just like my old one (what can I say – I know what I like), but he added a flamingo for Preservation in Pink. It is even better than the old one!  And now my car continues to get double takes wherever we go. It is always entertaining.

Proudly displaying my Preservation in Pink bumper sticker. My car is very happy.

And this bumper sticker launches the Preservation in Pink CafePress store. Right now, the bumper sticker is all that we’re selling, but it will grow to include mugs, shirts, etc.  Money earned from the store will go to fund web development and upkeep for Preservation in Pink.  Check out the image and link on the sidebar. Thanks in advance for your support!

Newsletter Contributions: Second Call

first call:

This issue’s theme is Preservation Now. What is most important to you, the preservationist, right now? What are you studying? What are your work projects? What are related current events and trends that we should be considering in the preservation field?

Second call:

Reminder to all: start thinking about contributions for the next issue of the Preservation in Pink newsletter! Send in your articles, comments, photographs, drawings, suggestions by the end of June. If you have an idea you want to run by me, please do. If you haven’t contributed before but are interested in it, you are encouraged to contribute! Tell your friends, colleagues, etc.

Thank you!

May 28, 2007

Three years ago today, I wrote the very first Preservation in Pink blog post. It was more of an announcement than a real post, but still, PiP has been a blog since May 28, 2007.  This goes back to the very first newsletter (6 pages only, all but one article written by me – just to get it out there). Three years ago I wasn’t exactly sure what I would do with a blog other than post the newsletter rather than requiring readers to rely on email. If you browse through the archives you’ll see that nothing happened with the blog again until October 2007 and then posts remained scattered through much of early 2008.

Blog posts began to take shape and routine around May 2008, when I attended the Poplar Forest Architectural Restoration field school. It wasn’t until the summer/fall of 2008 that I decided the Preservation in Pink should be more dynamic and that it should serve more of a purpose than announcing the newsletter. By August/September PiP became a daily (weekdays) routine.

Since those early days, readership has increased from a whopping average of 2 readers per day in 2007 (really, there was nothing to see anyway) to 19 per day in 2008 to 130 per day in 2009 and already at 200+ per day in 2010. Wow! And here we are hovering around 86,000 visits to Preservation in Pink.

This is the perfect time to say thank you to all of you, readers, who visit PiP, leave comments, share the link, display your magnets, and who offer encouragement and show interest. A great big thank you to guest bloggers. You have made PiP so much more diverse and are a wonderful addition to the blog! Mostly, I continue to write and share thoughts because it combines two of my passions – preservation and writing – but it makes me so happy that other people can connect to Preservation in Pink. From current events to ethics to road trips to the occasional soap box and personal essay with flamingo pictures and jokes, I hope that you can always find some way to connect with historic preservation through Preservation in Pink.  As always, whenever you have a suggestion for PiP or something you’d like to share, please do.

Thank you!

July 2010 Call for Articles

The next issue of the Preservation in Pink newsletter will be out in July 2010. This issue’s theme is Preservation Now. What is most important to you, the preservationist, right now? What are you studying? What are your work projects? What are related current events and trends that we should be considering in the preservation field?

Each issue always features writers discussing such ideas, but now is the time for everyone to consider what we are doing and where we are going.

How do you express yourself? Articles, cartoons, letters, photographs, whatever you have – share it!

Deadline: end of June 2010

Cutest Flamingo Fan

Presenting PiP’s youngest and cutest fan… Miss Claire, the adorable daughter of a good friend of mine. Claire is one of my favorite babies and definitely one of the cutest. She’s sort of hiding her flamingo outfit here, but it says Pretty & Pink.

It has matching pants, but since Claire is a southern summer baby, she doesn’t really need pants. However, these are the pants:

Actually, for any fans of Preservation in Pink and cute flamingos, the last few years of baby fashion seem to have flamingos in vogue. I know this because I’ve had many opportunities to share the flamingo love.  In addition to Miss Claire, my cousin has a toddler to whom I have definitely gifted flamingo attire.

PiP Media Updates

Preservation in Pink is expanding in the realm of social media. The Preservation in Pink Facebook group has been around for a while, but now there is a Preservation in Pink Facebook fan page. There isn’t a huge difference between a group and a fan page, but PiP is just keeping pace. So if you and your friends like the blog and newsletter, show your love!

You can now follow Preservation in Pink (presinpink) on Twitter. Currently both Facebook and Twitter are receiving the RSS feeds of blog posts. So if you prefer to not have your email inbox filled with PiP posts or your aren’t into Google Reader and such devices, then you can find short url links from your Facebook and Twitter feeds to give you a heads up that there is a new post. However you can still subscribe to PiP via readers and receive posts by email. The email subscription featured on the sidebar is directly from WordPress, which seems to be more efficient than Feedburner for sending emails on time.

Click the images above to become a fan or a follower on Twitter.

Note also a bit of sidebar reorganization on PiP. Find the Facebook and Twitter icons at the bottom of the page. Feel free to use the images in this post or the icons on the sidebar to direct others to PiP. Thank you to Vinny for designing such great logos (I love the road sign vibe of it.)

Any other ideas for PiP and social media?

Caring for and Recording Historic Buildings

Preservation in Pink January 2010

Want to read about bears, historic houses, and responsibilities? Of course. Read Melissa Celii’s article, “Teaching the Care of Historic Homes In Order to Maintain Value & Integrity” for her thoughtful discussion and possible solutions for those who are unable to afford the care of their historic houses. The article is filled with her usual wit and humor, and a lovely anecdote about bears. See pages 6-7.

What about houses in Scotland? Are you thinking of castles? In his article, “Architectural Audit of Aberdeen,” Jonathan Scott explains the conservation areas of place beyond castles, the towns and villages of Scotland and the project, the architectural audit, that is recording them. It’s similar but different to the United States preservation practices. Jonathan gives readers a good, short lesson in international preservation. See pages 8-9.

Preservation of Heirloom Seeds

Preservation in Pink January 2010

Taking historic preservation to another level, Jennifer Parsons writes about the preservation efforts for heirloom seeds. She discusses the importance of agricultural and seed diversity to our historic landscapes. Consider a historic house with a proper historic,heirloom seed garden.

Read Jennifer’s article, “Think Small in Your Preservation Efforts: Plant a Seed!” on pages 18-19.

Take a Preservation Vacation

Preservation in Pink January 2010

Going somewhere or do you just want to go somewhere? A handful of articles in the latest PiP Newsletter mention great places to visit.

Visit Hildene in Manchester, Vermont with Meghan Bezio (page 12)

Visit Oklahoma City with Maria Gissendanner (page 4)

Travel to Maine with Andrew Deci (page 5)

or take an amazing preservation service trip with Jamie Donahoe and Adventures in Preservation (page 14)

Have fun!

The Importance of Preservation Education

Preservation in Pink January 2010

Heritage education as a concept has many definitions and is used to refer in a generalized way to integrating historic preservation aspects into lesson plans or activities. Heritage education is slowly finding its way into classrooms and museums all over the country. The built environment is one of the most accessible and familiar resources to students of all ages, and by formally educating students to its worth and societal contribution they will be more apt to protect and venerate historic elements.

To read more of “Foundations in Education: The Importance of Heritage Education” by Kerry Vautrot turn to pages 10-11 in the January 2010 issue. See also her recommended list of Historic Preservation books for kids