Panton Schoolhouse

Can you spot a one-room schoolhouse as you’re driving by? I bet after this week of one-room schoolhouses here on PiP, you can! It’s a fun game. This ca. 1895 school in Panton, Vermont sits next to the town garage and serves as town storage. It appears as though it was the former home of the town offices, and the town bulletin board is still in use on the rear addition. Take a look. These one-room schoolhouses were called “District Schools” because each town was divided into districts and each district had its own school. This was before the days of school consolidation.

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Quite the sunny morning, and the iphone couldn’t avoid it. But, look at the bank of 6 windows on this school.

 

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Note the town bulletin board on the wing. Current fliers are posted there.

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Unlike most schoolhouses, this one has windows on both sides. Perhaps they were added when the building was no longer a schoolhouse.

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Bank of 6 windows.

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View into the schoolhouse shows storage and  original features (see the doors and beadboard).

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Peering into the back windows: town highway department storage. Also, note the wall on the left. The addition was added after the original construction date.

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The Town Highway Department. Photo taken standing in front of the schoolhouse.

Of course, I feel badly for this schoolhouse. While it’s sort of in use, there is so much more potential to it. Poor thing. It’s a common case for these schoolhouses, even though one room schoolhouses would be fairly easy to rehabilitate to modern uses. What do you think?

Elgin Springs House in the Springtime

Back in the wintertime, when Vermont still had snow on the ground, I stopped on the side of the road to photograph the Elgin Springs House. I’ve been fascinated by this house for over one year, so I thought I’d take the time to photograph it in the spring.

Elgin Springs House on Route 22A.

Something about this house makes me want to stare at it all day long; it is captivating. This house has been abandoned for over three decades, yet it is still standing. Metal poles are supporting the overhang of the second story and there are holes in the roof, but the house remains fairly square and upright. It is a testament to the quality of construction and the talent of the builders.

Zoom in to see the wider wood planks beneath the wood clapboards. You can also see the dentils on the soffit and the detail in the cornerboards.

And so much of the architectural details remain. Glass panes and window frames are almost all gone, likely to vandalism or Mother Nature, which immediately gives the house an aura of mystery and sadness.  Tattered curtains – once chosen and hung by a resident of the house – blow in the breeze in broken windows.

Broken shutters and tattered curtains.

The intricate screen doors hang loosely on the hinges. Few shutters remain, and those that cling to the house are broken and faded and deteriorating.

You can see the metal pole supporting the second story.

View of the front.

View of the southeast corner.

Another view of the original house (the two-story section is an addition according to the Vermont Sites & Structures Survey).

Next time I’ll use a different camera lens so I can zoom in for even closer details — like better views of the plaster and lath that you can see on the walls in a few pictures. See – the fascination? It’s ridiculous.

Outbuildings associated with the house.

How much sadder can this house get? I hate to think of it, but a few more hard winters like this one, and its future is looking grim.

Click and zoom in on all of these pictures at your leisure.

Do you know of similar, abandoned, sad houses that need to be photographed for memory? Let me know or send some pictures. Thanks!

Elgin Springs House

The Elgin Springs House in Panton, Vermont was built ca. 1845 by architect James Gorham. Originally a Classic Cottage, the Greek Revival addition (right) was built ca. 1850. Owner Solomon Allen and his son, Hiram, started an enterprise focused on the supposed medicinal qualities of nearby Elgin Springs. Guests to this boarding house/inn were encouraged to drink from a spring on a nearby hill, which would “purify blood.”

The Elgin Springs House in Panton, Vermont.

The book, New England: A Handbook for Travellers by Moses Foster Stewart (1875) writes of Elgin Springs, “About 3 miles south of Vergennes are fine cascades of Otter Creek, near which is the Elgin Spring (small hotel) containing sulphates [sic] of magnesia, iron, and soda, and carbonates of soda and lime” (page 184).

Closer view from the road.

South side of the house.

The Vermont State Historic Sites & Structures Survey recorded this house in 1977. At that it had already been abandoned and was identified as threatened. Now, 34 years later, the house sits abandoned and seems to facing demolition by neglect. As to the reasoning and its fate? I’ve only heard in passing that it’s caught up in a family matter.

Front of the house.

The poor, poor house.

Front door.

For those interested, yes, there is a “Keep Out/No Trespassing” sign. These pictures were taken from the road. And, of course, I love this house.

Historical information obtained from The Historic Architecture of Addison County: Vermont State Register of Historic Places, published by the Vermont Division for Historic Preservation (1992).

Mysterious House in Addison County

This week brings a comprehensive exam for the UVM HP program and a bunch of other assignments. It’s hectic and controls my life, as fellow current and former students will know. But instead of rambling on about homework, I’ll leave you with this mysterious house – mysterious in the sense that I know nothing of it. It is located on VT Route 22A South, just around the Panton and Addison town lines. If you know anything about it, please share!

VT Route 22A just around the Addison/Panton line.

Northbound.

The windows and doors are no more; it looks as though the wind may knock it over during any storm. But it’s fascinating and it is my current (non school) obsession.