Vermont’s Christmas Tree

Each year the Governor of Vermont hosts the lighting of the Christmas tree, which sits on the cascading granite steps of the Vermont State House. Everyone is invited to hear Christmas carols by schoolchildren, listen to a few words by the Governor and then enjoy the decorated interior of the State House with cookies and cider.

Montpelier was graced with a balmy 45 degree afternoon on December 5, 2013 and many Vermonters joined Governor Peter Shumlin. The carolers were children from Westminster, VT.

The Vermont State House prior to the start of the tree lighting ceremony.

The Vermont State House prior to the start of the tree lighting ceremony.

And the tree is lit!

And the tree is lit! This year’s tree is 40′ tall from Waitsfield, VT.

The tree inside the State House was decorated by volunteers.

The tree inside the State House was decorated by volunteers.

The chandelier acted as a tree star.

The chandelier acted as a tree star.

A beautiful tree!

A beautiful tree!

Handmade ornaments include historic photographs of the State House.

Handmade ornaments include historic photographs of the State House.

A few more historic photographs. Clarification: reproductions, not actual historic photos.

A few more historic photographs. Clarification: reproductions, not actual historic photos.

The State House demonstrates beautiful Greek Revival architecture. The ceiling is spectacular. Here everyone is enjoying cookies and cider in the main foyer.

The State House demonstrates beautiful Greek Revival architecture. The ceiling is spectacular. Here everyone is enjoying cookies and cider in the main foyer. Abraham Lincoln observes.

Merry Christmas Vermont!

Merry Christmas Vermont!

Thank you to Governor Shumlin for hosting the Christmas Tree Lighting. And to the staff (fellow preservationists) who decorated (David, Tracy, Thad and volunteers) – the State House looks even more beautiful this time of year. What a lovely way to begin the holiday season. Merry Christmas!

Preservation Photos #182

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The Vermont State House with its gardens in full bloom. How lucky it feels to see this building every day and observe it with the changing seasons.

The State House in the summer and winter.

Valentines in Montpelier

Every year the Montpelier Valentine Phantom plasters the city with hearts. It’s lovely. Here are a few images of the historic downtown, heart style.

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Winter Entrances

January thaw, you were nice while you were here in Vermont. Now we welcome February and the returning cold, snowy weather. Speaking of cold, opening an exterior door in the winter can rush in waves of freezing weather aside from the snow our boots track in the doors. In these cold climate states, winter is beautiful but often messy. Living in Vermont I’ve noticed exterior winter preparations that I haven’t seen elsewhere, whether New York or North Carolina. Most of us remove screens, put on or pull down storm windows, turn off the outside faucets, bring in fair weather plants, add water hog mats at our fronts doors, and keep shovels at hand.

Montpelier, VT. The entire hooded entrance is removed in the warm weather.

Montpelier, VT. The entire hooded entrance is removed in the warm weather. The fanlight and sidelights of the entrance match those on this historic building. Historic integrity remains intact.

In Vermont, winter preparations go to another level. Lately I’ve noticed that many buildings have temporary winter entrance enclosures (see above). Rather than an open porch, a hooded, walled entrance can be installed on a building. This will provide energy savings, as well allow for less cleaning – take those boots off at the entrance! The Montpelier entrance is a good example of preserving historic integrity, even in the cold weather. Perhaps a good suggestion for residences and businesses. Have you seen any winter entrances where you live? Or other winter preparations?

Middlebury, Vermont

Middlebury, VT. This actually is on the building year round, but it reminded me of the Montpelier example. Anyone from Middlebury? How is this different than it used to be? (This is not a quiz; it’s actually a question.)

Local Business: Grunhaus

Preservationists love local businesses, and Preservation in Pink is happy to play a part in supporting them since local businesses improve our communities and quality of life. So if you’re cruising the streets of Montpelier, Vermont, swing by the Grunhaus (Nordic Street Eats). A lovely couple run this cart (looks like a castle, yes?) and the food is delicious. If you’re new there, they are happy to explain the choices and they’ll chat with you while they prepare your food. It takes only a few minutes. Bring cash, not plastic. The cart is normally parked near the intersection of State & Elm Streets. And yes, they are there all winter!

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Enjoy!

(Note: Preservation in Pink is voluntarily reviewing this business and is not compensated for this review. The point is to spread good news about good local businesses.)