Friday Vermont Links

Today is the annual downtown & historic preservation conference (combined this year!) in Poultney, VT. The entire conference sounds like fun, but I’m most looking forward to the Streets as Places theme.

Some news from Vermont:

The Vermont Division for Historic Preservation has awarded $186,000 in grant money for preservation and restoration projects throughout the state.

Lake Champlain has reached its record high water level and it seems as though the entire state is flooding. The Charlotte-Essex (NY) ferry is shut down due to high water levels. Rivers and lakes throughout the state are flooding towns across the state. This will create damage for all buildings and displace people and businesses for a time.  If you are aware of a historic building in danger, be alert, now and when the water recedes.

On the night of Sunday April 17, a fire broke out in the historic Brooks House on Main Street in Brattleboro. The five-story French Second Empire building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The building was home to many businesses and apartments; their fate is unknown at this time.

On a lighter note, the site of the University of Vermont’s first baseball diamond will be recognized on April 30 in the Old North End of Burlington.

Have you heard of the Checkered House Bridge project in Richmond, VT? The metal truss bridge is going to be widened. You can learn more about this unique project on its website.

In connection to Vermont and its tourism, what are your thoughts on covered bridge preservation? A Richmond (Virginia) Times Dispatch article seems to debate the fate and purpose of such a thing. A necessity? An obligation? Too much money? Would a state like Vermont, known for its covered bridges, think it’s a frivolous expense?

A Very Fine Appearance: The Vermont Civil War Photographs of George Houghton was released earlier this month. The book includes over 100 photographs from the Vermont infantry experience during the Civil War. Photographs were all taken by Brattleboro resident George Houghton. You can buy the book in hardcover or paperback through the Vermont Historical Society.

Happy Spring! Happy weekend!

Friday Links

Happy Friday! Here are some preservation related links from around the web:

Neon signs in New York City.

An excellent article about the value of sense of place (and historic preservation) from the Urban Land Institute.

Take advice from Sabra and change the [preservation] world with kindness. Write a letter to someone, a business, or an organization that has acted in favor of preservation.

How to preserve Auschwitz? (Thanks for the link, Adam.)

A barn collapses in Saratoga County, New York. (Thanks for the link, Luke.)

Wondering about the biggest snowstorms in history?

Need a summer field school? How about San Gemini, Italy Program – a 12 week summer course. (Thanks for the heads up, Andrew.)

Save America’s Treasures Grant Winners announced for 2010.

A winter sky is much different from a summer sky.

Friday Links: News and Play

I am boycotting CVS. Actually, all of the drug stores bother me, but in this case, CVS has top billing. According to a Preservation Nation blog post, CVS is disregarding an agreement with the National Trust and demolishing a historically significant church in Memphis to build a store. How appalling. Others are sure to follow: Walgreens, Rite Aid, Kinney Drug, Eckerd, etc.

Need a good preservation book to read? The University of Mary Washington Center for Historic Preservation has announced the 2011 Book Prize Candidates.

Also from the UMW Center for Historic Preservation, check out this comparison chart of undergraduate HP programs.

Wishing it were summer? It’s not too early to start thinking of internships or field schools. HISTPRES is definitely the most up-to-date source for young professionals.

Did you see this NY Times article about a preservation dispute about a Chelsea (New York City) row house? This building is affiliated with the Underground Railroad, perhaps the only documented station in Manhattan. The owner has added (well, the addition is in progress) has fifth floor, for which the permit has now been revoked.

Ever hear about the idea of preservation of play? Here is a NY Times article that discusses how children have forgotten how to play and how some parents are fixing it.

In May 2005 there was a conference called Preserve and Play: Preserving Historic Entertainment and Recreation Resources — not exactly the same as the article, but connected. I would have loved that conference. Did any of you, readers, attend?

Did you know that there is a National Museum of Play in Rochester, New York?  It appears to be a lot of hands-on exhibits, but check out the online museum collections.

Happy Friday! Enjoy your weekend. Go Play!

Friday Links

Rather than tell you about the remaining school assignments I have, I thought I’d find some interesting preservation links for you. Happy December! Happy snow!

Enjoy.

* Ah, Long Island, or ultimate suburbia as I call it. Fortunately, there are still some hints of its interesting past. I have no idea how I came across this blog, but Old Long Island features historic images of the great Long Island estates (think Great Gatsby style).  Some posts have Library of Congress images, some have real estate ads, others are from books and other printed materials; most are linked with images to Google Earth. Even if you do not have a Long Island connection, the architecture of these estates is beautiful.

* Sabra, over at My Own Time Machine, always finds interesting articles and current event topics. I love a recent post of hers about Historic Heidelberg – Kerlin Farm, located outside Philadelphia. From the post, this is the issue:

WHAT:   Now under threat of demolition, one of the oldest residences in Pennsylvania at 1050 Ashbourne Road, Cheltenham, PA.  The 300+ year old estate hearkens to the very beginning of European settlement in this region.  It would be difficult to stand in a place that more completely describes the settlement and growth of a particular place over the course of three centuries.  Now it is facing the wrecking ball.

Click through for more information. Be sure to read Sabra’s comment to mine addressing issues such as how much is too far gone, stabilizing ruins, and the education system.

* Route 66 News talks about an article that finds John Steinbeck’s Travels with Charley to be fiction. Personally, I could care less if it’s fiction. I love the book anyway. You?

* Are you an alum of the UVM Historic Preservation program? Check out the new HP alumni website. And come to the party on Saturday.

* This warrants a much longer discussion, but for now: the University of Mary Washington has a master plan to raze seven buildings including the historic 1931 Seacobeck Dining Hall. Seriously, UMW? Your historic preservation program is one of the best undergraduate programs in the country and you’re not going to take the advice of that department? Bad move.

* Actually, Preservation Nation’s Story of the Day feature often has stories about demolition threats. Yikes! (Not to be confused with that yikes!) Isn’t it time people got over the whole demolition thing? It’s not green, people.

* Christmas and historic mansions? Oh, how grand living that life must have been.

Shared with me, courtesy of Sabra, who found this on Etsy (via caramelos). If anyone has sent one the way of Preservation in Pink, I’ll love you forever (ahem, sisters). Just kidding! But they are adorable.

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Unrelated but worth sharing:

Follow my sister Annie O’Shea through the skeleton World Cup race series this winter.

Send thank you notes to the United States soldiers! (It takes about five seconds.)

Halloween Links

Happy (almost) Halloween PiP readers! Here are some fun links for your enjoyment:

Route 66 News has some great ghost stories to share: top ghost sites on Route 66 & The Ghost of the Painted Desert Inn. (Awesome posts, Ron!)

Old House Web‘s ghost stories from readers: The  Haunted Old Schoolhouse, The Haunted House in Dubuque, Iowa, The Mysterious Rocking Cradle, The House on Haunted North Hill, & A Fright at Winchester.

This sounds terrifying: Vinyl Preservation Society of Idaho. Aaaahhh!! (But it’s actually records, not vinyl siding. Phew. Got me there.)

Check out these British asylums.

In Burlington this weekend? Take a walking tour of Elmwood Cemetery with Preservation Burlington. Find them on Facebook, too.

In Southern Vermont? Check out the VINS Hoots & Howls event on Saturday October 30. Sure to be a good time for the whole family. Preservation – conservation – wildlife – all connected.

Or you could take a Ghost Walk of the Queen City (Burlington). Here are more Vermont Halloween events.

Or head to Mary Washington’s Ghost Walk in downtown Fredericksburg, VA.

Have fun!

Autumn on the UVM campus.

Roadside Friday Links

Chilliwack, BC, Canada is losing its dinosaur theme park, Dinoland, which was originally affiliated with Hanna Barbara and named Bedrock City (who else loves The Flintstones!?) You can watch a video of its history and catch some Flintstone images here. The park will close forever on September 6, 2010. Why is it closing? The owner decided to sell the property for financial and health related reasons. Dinoland has the claim as “North America’s only cartoon dinosaur town.” Though it was only 35 years, roadside culture and amusement seems like it’s losing a bit of history.

The United States actually has a few Flintstone related parks: Flintstone’s Bedrock City in Custer, South Dakota and Bedrock City in Valle, Arizona. There is also Dinosaur Park in Rapid City, South Dakota.

These Friday links so often seem to be roadside related. I couldn’t hide my obsession if I tried, so I might as well continue on today’s inadvertent theme.

On that note, abandoned interstates intrigue me and crack me up at the same time, like the I-189 interchange in Burlington that has been sitting there for decades. I’ve heard that the tallest filing cabinet in South Burlington is a monument to the amount of paperwork the interchange and road extension, dubbed the Southern Connector or the Champlain Parkway (another post for another time).  You would expect to find an abandoned old road, but an interstate? Apparently it’s rather common. Check out “Why the Lost Highway” and this page of abandoned freeways. The site itself is quite dated, but still entertaining.

Parkways and carefully designed highways are some of the most enjoyable. What will happen to the Pasadena Freeway and the Merritt Parkway? See this NY Times blog post. The Merritt Parkways is also on the National Trust’s 11 Most Endangered Places List for 2011. How do we adapt historic roads without destroying their character?

Is anyone attending the Historic Roads 2010 conference in Washington, DC from September 9-12? Please share! One attendee, Heidi Beierle has been cycling from Oregon to DC and chronicling her adventures along the way in the effort to research the impacts of bicycle tourism on rural communities. Talk about dedication!  Check out her blog and see her route.

Need more roadside fun? Of course. Check out the blog Go BIG or Go Home, for a family’s adventures as they travel to everything giant. I LOVE it.

Have I actually run out of new roadside photos to share? How about an old one?

The 2006 Corn Palace in Mitchell, SD. Photo by Sarah O'Shea.

Summer corn, yum. Funny story: the restaurant that was supposed to have the best corn ever, located next to the corn palace, actually ran out of corn and we didn’t get to have any. It figures. Anyway, happy weekend! Happy Labor Day!

Friday Links

The Brooklyn Bridge Forest project brings yet another link to preservation + sustainability. The general idea? Growing and responsibly maintaining a tropical hardwood forest to replace the 11,000 planks of tropical hardwood on the Brooklyn Bridge when necessary, rather than using uncharacteristic synthetic wood.

Love Route 66? Scott Piotrowski has picked up his blogging again (hooray!) about Historic Roads in Los Angeles County, CA. He plans to uncover the final 66 miles of Route 66 in 66 different blog entries leading up to 2012 Route 66 Festival in Santa Monica. That sounds like quite the task – and interesting one at that! Leave a comment on his blog with suggestions & encouragement.

Speaking of Route 66, who wants to buy the NR listed Blue Swallow Motel in Tucumcari, New Mexico? It’s for sale!

And, if you’re a fan of the movie Cars you may know that Disneyland is opening “Cars Land” in summer 2012. Scroll down for a bit info and some pictures.

Anyone attending the Society for Industrial Archaeology’s Fall Tour in Vermont this September? I’ll be there, helping out with the Saturday Burlington tour.

Looking for a job? Many have been appearing on PreserveNet lately, many more than earlier in the summer.

Is anyone taking the Ivy Tech (Madison, IN) online course: Introduction to Historic Preservation? I’d be interested to hear about your experiences.

Any starting your undergrad major or graduate degree in preservation? Please share!

Happy weekend; hope the last one of August treats you well! Get out and about while it’s still warm and sunny!

Friday Links

History & film buffs: You may have noticed that Google is celebrating the 71st birthday of The Wizard of Oz movie (1939). I just love Judy Garland. The book is titled The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, dating to 1900.

It’s county fair season in Vermont! Visit the proclaimed largest agricultural fair (in Vermont), the 62nd Addison County fair through Sunday August 14.

Taking a road trip soon? Check out Roadside Peek for a large collection of neon, kitsch, maps, attractions, and a roadside blog. The formatting of the site seems a bit off, but the information is very entertaining.

Someday I want to travel the Loneliest Road in America (but not alone!) — Highway 50 across Nevada, paralleling the Pony Express Trail. Find more road trip routes via America’s Byways.

Meet the new President of the National Trust, Stephanie Meeks, via a video and a letter on the Preservation Nation blog.

I Googled “I love historic preservation” and some of the first links I see include quotes that say, “I love historic preservation, but…” That is not what should appear! No qualifiers! What do you think?

On a happier note, more and more organizations are providing curriculum assistance for teachers who want to engage their students in historic preservation and history. Check out the Teachers and Students Portal from the Wisconsin Historical Society.

If I had my own street, it would surely be this:

By author, December 2006, Cape Cod, MA.

Happy weekend!