Thanksgiving Flamingo-grams

Hoping everyone had a lovely extended weekend. Count your blessings year round. Here are some of mine from the weekend.

You can follow Preservation in Pink happenings through Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and Flickr — the sources for photographs and images if it’s not a blog post day. All of these are linked to each other (so the images should be found at each source) can be found on the sidebar of the main blog page. And every so often I’ll round up the images for a Flamingo-grams post on the blog. You’ll notice that not every photograph is directly historic preservation – some includes family, travel, baking, pets, just bits and pieces from my sense of place and environment. If you have links to share, please do.

And Happy 21st Birthday to my youngest sister, Erin!

Flamingo on Flickr

You may have noticed that there is now a Flickr widget on the sidebar (scroll down a bit if you can’t see it) on Preservation in Pink. Originally, I planned to jump on the Flick bandwagon and share pictures of beautiful architecture and scenic landscape as I was on the go (oh, the wonders of a smart phone — I’m new to that bandwagon, too). However, try as hard as I might, and my phone photography skills are no match for an actual camera.

Before I could stop myself, my new little flamingo was appearing in lots of pictures. Added encouragement from others, who shall remain nameless, and I decided that Flickr would likely be an outlet for flamingo pictures. Consider the traveling gnome… only I have a cute, fluffy traveling flamingo.

Traveling flaming.

His name? Mr. Stilts. (I cannot take credit for the name. Thanks go to Brennan.) Also, a big thank you to my sister Erin who gave me the flamingo for my birthday.

Check out the sidebar and Flickr every so often and you’re sure to find architecture and landscape – with a fluffy flamingo jumping in the way. Pardon my inexperience with Flickr tabs and what not – I’ll get there.

National Historic Landmarks Photography Contest

When you visit a historic site, what do you see? Do you see just the building or do you see the landscape? What speaks to you about a particular site? Do you ever have a shot that shows off your skill and your feelings for the subject in the photograph? Do you ever impress yourself with your photography skills? Now is the time to share those skills?

How? Enter the National Historic Landmarks 2010 Photography Contest. From the website:

The contest name, “Imaging Our National Heritage” encourages people to use their cameras to capture the meaning of the National Historic Landmark in a photo. We hope you’re inspired to visit our nation’s National Historic Landmarks, seek out the stories that have formed our American history, and create your own image to share.

The contest is easy to enter by posting your photographs to Flickr and tagging them appropriately (read: “2010nhlphotocontest“). The photographs must be of National Historic Landmarks, which you can look up in the database.  Find all of the official rules and specifications on the NHL Photo Contest website (download the documents on the left hand side).  The contest ends September 10, 2010 and NPS employees across the country will vote for the winning entries.

Visit the NHLs and capture your feelings! Enter one image per NHL, but you can submit up to 10 images. You could be famous!

See also Sabra’s post about the contest over at My Own Time Machine.

Playgrounds of Yesterday

Following up yesterday’s Preservation Photos #25 post, which featured the Giant Stride, here’s a glance at other unique playground equipment from the early 20th century. Of course there are many sources with great photographs and information, so consider this a sampling.

First, a search through the Library of Congress digital records always provides good entertainment:

Another Giant Stride (or is it a may pole?) - at a playground in New York City, ca. 1910-1915. Source: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division (click).

Merry-go-round, ca. 1918-1920. Source: Library of Congress Prints & Photographs (click).

A playground apparatus that reminds me of a merry-go-round and a giant stride combined. Source: Library of Congress (click).

A children's city playground. Source: Library of Congress Prints & Photographs (click).

Seesaw, 1902, in Chicago, IL. Source: American Memory, LOC (click).

With the digital world taking over, Flickr is a wonderful resource as well. People share their own images as well as scanning in magazines, advertisements, etc. By searching for “playground” in the uploads or the “playground” groups, you will find some awesome images. Most of it will be mid 20th century, not ca. 1910 or 1920, but it’s fascinating in a different way. Check out the sets by Nels_P_Olsen on Flickr for images of vintage defunct and surviving playgrounds.

Part of the 1975 Miracle Equipment Company playground catalog. Click and scan through the other pages. Source: Nels_P_Olsen.

More from the Miracle Playground Equipment catalog. I include this one for my sisters and our friends at Norwood Elementary: that thing we always called the spider web -- apparently it's a geodesic dome (note bottom). Source: Nels_P_Olsen, flickr (click).

For more, try the “old playground furniture” group. See also this August 26, 2009 “Playgrounds” post from PiP.

How’s that, Erin? Enough to hold you over? I’ll post more in the future. When you’re out exploring, be sure to let me know of any great old playgrounds! Let’s go build a giant stride in the backyard for now.