#PastForward Recap: Social Media

Days of good sessions and good conversations at the National Preservation Conference left me with too many thoughts and take-aways for one post. And, I’d like to continue conversations that we started at the conference. Rather than overwhelm all of us, I’ll take it one post and one conversation at a time. Interested? Read on, and join in for the comments, whether you attended the conference or not.

Mr. Stilts is all over the #thisplacematters flag!

Mr. Stilts is all over the #thisplacematters flag!

Let’s talk social media!

The recent social media buzz are decries of “social media isn’t real life!” “avoid social media!” “be present!” and many more proclamations about the negative impacts it has on society. And, of course, it has some merit. Social media shouldn’t overwhelm or control your whole life. Your worth does not depend on social media. Stop spending so much time in front of a screen (say the critics to a country where most people work with computers). Stop documenting everything or posting your life to Instagram. And on and on.

Rather than the negative, let’s focus on the positive. Last week at Past Forward at the Emerging Professionals session we talked about how social media is helping our organizations. Many of us met each other in real life (“IRL”) for the first time after years of being online social media preservation friends. And those of us who know each other already might only catch up IRL at the annual conference, but we keep in touch throughout the year as friends and colleagues. Our professional (and friendship) networks have increased exponentially because of the power of the internet and social media platforms. And, our preservation message is so much easier to spread. Our time and money are used much more efficiently.

What’s your example of positive connections via social media? As for me, my network wouldn’t be what it is without blogging and other platforms. Other than blogging, Instagram is my favorite.

Why Instagram? I love documentation. I love documenting the fun, happy moments of life in order to create a collage of memories. Sometimes I scroll through my own Instagram to look back over the last few years. And I like seeing what my friends are snapping – what are they storing in their Instagram collages. It’s fun. And an image triggers memories of a day, a trip, a quiet morning at home, holidays, friends, family – whatever it might be. (Now if only Instagram would add the day rather than “weeks ago”). I do keep more than one Instagram account – one public account for Preservation in Pink purposes and one private account for friends and family with just a handful of followers. It’s a good system for me.

Such “snapshot” platforms aren’t good for all. The teen who quit Instagram shows the dark side of imagery and a staged life, and the harm it can take on one’s self-worth. And it’s true, comparison is the thief of joy. It can be easy to get sucked in to the snapshot comparison – who has a better job, a better house, a better city, a better social life? We’re only human! I know. I quit Facebook almost two years ago for many reasons including because I spent too much time aimlessly scrolling, comparing, and feeling as though my life was on exhibit. I haven’t looked back. However, I know some people love it and some businesses thrive because of Facebook.

Social media: it depends on how you use it and for what purpose. There are definite lines between the good of social media and the bad. Hopefully we all have learned or have someone to help us learn.

#thisplacematters. Who doesn't love a good hashtag?

#thisplacematters. Who doesn’t love a good hashtag?

Many preservation groups connect with new audiences because of social media and that makes preservation a more relatable and tangible field. A friendlier field, if you will. Imagery is powerful and graphic based platforms and websites can draw in new readers, supporters, and preservationists. And with that, I whole-heartedly say that it is a great time to be a preservationist.

Questions for discussion:

  • What do you think?
  • Do you use social for work or personal or both?
  • Is social media better for one or the other?
  • Have you dropped a particular platform (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc.) and why?

Other #PastForward Recaps: Emerging Professionals. More to come next week!

Post Conference, Getting Back into the Swing of Things 

   
Conferencing is exhausting in the best way: inspiring, thought-provoking, social, dynamic, and on the go (which can be difficult in heels). Now that we’re all back at work, I’d like to hear what you learned and what you’re thinking about these days. I’ll be sharing my take-aways and conversation starters throughout this week. I hope you’ll join in the discussion. Catch up on twitter and instagram by searching #PastForward. 

Happy Monday! 

#PastForward: Emerging Professionals

pastforward

Who will be at the Past Forward (National Trust) conference this week? Some people are already on their way. I’m looking forward to the many intriguing sessions (urban-centric, federal policies, etc.), meeting new preservation friends and catching up with old friends.

I’m very excited to be speaking at the conference this year! Join me on Wednesday November 4, for the session, “Emerging Professionals in Historic Preservation.” The session runs from 1-4pm, and it’s divided into three mini sessions, so you can stop in for one talk, two, or all three. I’ll be speaking on “Engaging Millennials,” “Technology +Historic Preservation,” and “(A)Typical Careers in Preservation.” After each talk, the floor opens for a roundtable discussion.

Come to listen, come with questions! The Emerging Professionals group has some fun planned, too, so it’s more than just listening and talking.We’re looking for those emerging professionals, but also seasoned professionals who have advice to share or want to meet some new people.

Hope to see you there!

Capture2

Five Questions with Raina Regan on Instagram + Preservation

For years now, I’ve had preservation friends from social media; but, it was only about two years ago that I started to meet my “social media” friends in “real life”. I love making the world smaller and meeting friends who are doing inspiring work. Enter a new series to Preservation in Pink: Five Questions With. In this series, I’ll be talking with colleagues, social media friends, and others I admire to learn some tricks of the trade, hear their stories, and introduce you to more preservationists.

First up, Raina Regan!

Raina is one of my dear preservation pals and we finally met at the Society for Industrial Archeology Conference in Minneapolis/St. Paul in June 2013 after talking for years through our blogs and twitter. We both love our cats, Taylor Swift, photography, preservation, and conferences!

You might know Raina Regan from her work with Indiana LandmarksSteller storiesTwitter, or more likely, her incredible Instagram account. Beautifully composed photographs filled with architectural layers and a mission to show viewers the world through her preservationist eyes,

Raina’s Instagram feed is always one of my favorites. Thinking we could all learn a few tips from Raina, I asked if she’d answer a few questions for Preservation in Pink readers. Read the interview below!

1. How long have you been on Instagram? Why did you start, and what do you love about it? 

I joined instagram in January 2012. I joined Instagram almost immediately after purchasing my first iPhone. I had seen a few friends on the app and really loved the way it was being used to call attention to historic homes, details, and little known places.

Interesting story, my first Instagram photo is a Modern home which is now on our Indiana Landmarks 10 Most Endangered list. I feel like that speaks to what my account has been and continues to be about: historic places (with some other fun stuff sprinkled in).

There are so many things I love about Instagram today, from the friendships I’ve made both in Indianapolis and around the globe. Instagram has opened my eyes and made me more observant of my surroundings.

2. You’re quite well known on Instagram (especially for a preservationist)! Taylor Swift has you beat at 50 million, but you have 23K. That is impressive! And, I’m so proud of you. How did you rise to instagram fame? 

At the end of March, I was surprised by a message from instagram informing me I had been selected as a suggested user.  Every two weeks, Instagram selects a handful (around 200) of users around the globe to highlight. How they select these users is relatively unknown. I like to think it is because I am actively involved with in my local Instagram community (@igersindy) and I provide a unique point of view that highlights architecture. Being selected a suggested user, instagram encourages you to be a “model instagrammer.” I try to stay active by posting daily, commenting and liking photos, attending instameets, participating in the weekend hashtag project, and trying new things with my photography.

3. Your photos are beautiful. Can you share your top tips for insta-worthy photos? 

The grid is your friend! I always have the grid on my camera app turned on and I use it as a guide when taking my shots. There’s a photography trick called the “rule of thirds” (google it for tutorials) which I try to follow when composing my photos and is particularly helpful for instagram. Both of these tips have really helped me increase the quality of my photos.

I primarily use the native iPhone camera for the majority of my Instagram photos. But, I do edit them in a few iPhone apps. My favorites are Snapseed for original editing (such as brightness), VSCO to add a touch of filter, and SKRWT to straighten or fix any skew. I also really enjoy GeotagMyPic which allows you to add the geotag information back into a photo.

4. How do you see instagram playing a role in historic preservation? 

Imagery and storytelling is such an important part of saving historic places. Connecting people to places, increasing awareness, or even reawakening someone’s memories of a place all can be done through instagram. I love getting comments from someone with a favorite memory of a historic place I’ve posted, or comments such as “I hope they preserve that place.” I find that most people I interact with on Instagram are preservationists at heart — even if they aren’t one professionally. We need to do a better job mobilizing these people to get them engaged in the preservation movement more directly.

5. What is your favorite instagram photo?

That’s a hard one, but I would say this photo of the Indiana War Memorial (see below). The War Memorial is one of my favorite historic places in Indianapolis and I love the composition of this photo and the play of textures.

Thank you, Raina! Keep up the great work!

p.s. Raina and I are collaborating for a fun (soon-to-be-announced) event during this year’s #pastforward conference. Stay tuned! 

p.p.s. You can follow Raina’s cat Quincy on Instagram, too. You know you want to.

https://instagram.com/p/0EN0szNSbR/

NTHP Savannah 2014: A Location Review

A street near Forsyth Park: porches, brick sidewalk, mature trees.

A street near Forsyth Park: porches, brick sidewalk, mature trees.

Savannah, Georgia: a perfect setting for the National Trust for Historic Preservation Conference (or “PastForward” as we call it these days). Historic homes and live oaks draped with spanish moss line the gridded streets and monumental squares of Savannah, planned in the manner of the Ogelthorpe Plan. Everywhere you look, the architecture is beautiful and photo-worthy. It’s a photogenic city in every sense of the word (and we preservationists love our photographic documentation). The Savannah Historic District is a National Historic Landmark District designated in 1966. The Historic Savannah Foundation is active in restoration, stewardship, and community involvement to achieve its mission of preserving and protecting Savannah’s heritage. Students of the Savannah College of Art & Design benefit from having Savannah as a living, learning lab. Historic preservation and heritage are common conversations in Savannah (not to imply that it is always easy). You can understand why preservationists were excited for a conference in Savannah. After attending the conference, I can say that my excitement for Savannah was well worth it. The National Trust has always put together great conferences, too.

However, I am interested in discussing the location in more detail. Anyone up for it? Let me explain. Many of the conference sessions were held at the Savannah International Trade & Convention Center located on Hutchinson Island, which is across the river from the city of Savannah. It’s a short drive over the bridge or a free ferry ride across the river, which wasn’t really a big deal. The issue that I found (and discussed and overheard many times) related to the fact that the convention center felt so far removed from downtown Savannah.

Looking at Hutchinson Island, waiting for the ferry from the Savannah side.

Looking at Hutchinson Island, waiting for the ferry from the Savannah side.

Why did it feel so far removed? The only places on the island were the convention center and a Westin hotel. This meant that there were no local businesses to support on the island. Your break between sessions, if any break, could not be spent wandering the street to another session and passing by the local stores or cafes. Speaking of cafes, there was no place to buy a cup of coffee or a snack or lunch on the island, unless you wanted to spend an arm and a leg at the corporate hotel next door. If you took time to catch the ferry and head back to the city side, you would miss sessions, probably those lunch time sessions! That was not convenient.

In such a large convention center, there was definitely space to contract with a few local cafes or caterers to sell coffee, lunch, or snacks. If contracts limited that option, perhaps that was not the best location. On Thursday and Friday there were “nosh and network” breaks in the preservation studio, but it didn’t quite fit the bill. Most people eat and drink coffee on different schedules. This seemed like a major oversight.

In a city so large with so many hotels located in the downtown historic district, it would seem that session locations could be spread out and attendees could walk from one to another or easily slip outside for a coffee before catching the next session. Spending most of the day in a convention center, only staring at the historic district across the river, felt odd to a preservationist, particularly to one attending a historic preservation conference.

Perhaps there were perfectly good reasons to site the conference across the river. It should be noted that field sessions, TrustLive and other events were located on the city side of the river, but many sessions were held at the convention center. I’d be interested to know why. And I’d recommend to the National Trust that the next conference be sited more in line with preservation practices.

In summary: great conference content, great overall location, poor conference HQ choice.

What do you think?

In Savannah at the National Historic Preservation Conference

This week is the annual National Trust for Historic Preservation Conference in Savannah, GA. If you’re in with the social media crowd (anyone can be, jump on!) you’ll see the hashtag #presconf and #pastforward. If you see that this week, you’ll know that person is hanging out with a couple of thousand preservationists in Savannah. It’s warm and sunny and beautiful, and I’m looking forward an intense few days of preservation overload, in the best possible way. Already, I’ve been touring Georgia with some of my Vermont preservation colleagues and we’ve had a blast and some true southern experiences. I hope you don’t mind picture overload! Get ready for more this week.

If you’re not able to be here in Savannah, the NTHP has made it easier to join from afar. Check out these live streaming events. Register (free) so you can get your virtual attendance packets. Hope you enjoy. Let me know how it goes! 

One part of the conference includes the exhibitor’s hall, at which preservation minded businesses, organizations, and schools set up camp to chat with conference goers and let everyone know what they have to offer. This week it is my pleasure to share with you the Historic Bridge Foundation. Read on in the next post. 

Philly Forum 2014

forum2014

This week Philadelphia welcomes Forum 2014: A Keystone Connection, the Statewide Conference on Heritage / Byways to the Past. The 2014 conference is a partnership between the National Alliance of Preservation Commissions, Preservation Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, and the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.

Transportation, historic preservation, history, technology – this conference looks like it’s going to be great. Tickets sold out! Will you be there? I’ll be presenting on Thursday July 17 as part of the session, Crossing into History: Compatible Bridge Design in Historic Districts. Here’s the panel summary and speakers:

Bridges are not always mere conduits for transportation, but can play important roles in shaping, or affecting, the identity of a place.  While some bridges are small and unnoticeable, others are visual representations of a particular period in time and important elements of historic settings.  What happens when a bridge in an historic setting cannot be rehabilitated?   How do you design a new bridge that is compatible with the setting but does not end up looking historicized?  Is it better to design a bridge that is modern and does not attempt to imitate history or is it possible to develop compatible new designs that reflect their setting.  This session will explore these issues and offer insight into appropriate context sensitive design.

Moderator:

  • Monica Harrower, Cultural Resources Professional, PennDOT District 6-0

Speakers:

  • Michael Cuddy, Principal, TranSystems
  • Mary McCahon, Senior Historian, TranSystems
  • Barbara Shaffer, Planning and Environmental Specialist, Federal Highway Administration
  • Dain Gattin, Chief Engineer, Philadelphia Streets Department
  • Emanuel Kelly, FAIA, Philadelphia Art Commission
  • Kaitlin O’Shea, Historic Preservation Specialist, Vermont Agency of Transportation


Join us to learn about historic bridges, replacement projects, and historic districts!

Island Pond Hands on Hammers

Hammers, nails, hauling old carpet, cleaning trash, moving building materials, painting, installing board and batten siding, good food, rural Vermont…and that’s just the basic outline of a very productive day in Island Pond – “Hands on Hammers.” Surprisingly the weather behaved, and by the afternoon we had warm and sunshine. The work day is a new addition to the conference, and an excellent opportunity for us preservationists to walk the walk, as opposed to only talking. The Preservation Trust of Vermont will share the work day video and summary soon, but here are a few photos of the day. Does your state conference have a work day? What else do you do in addition to sessions and receptions? We in Vermont would love to know!

Starting early in the day. Note the windows missing and siding missing.

The carpenters get to work, starting early in the day. Note the windows missing and siding missing.

Scaffolding for all of the carpentry work.

Scaffolding for all of the carpentry work.

Paint and more paint!

Paint and more paint, and sawing.

This is after cleaning. We removed junk along with heavy carpet & pad, moldy beadboard, building materials, and a piano. This looks much better!

This is after cleaning. We removed junk along with heavy carpet & pad, moldy beadboard, building materials, and a piano. This looks much better!

Back outside, many volunteers at work.

Back outside, many volunteers at work.

Fellow UVM alums and colleagues: the two (C)(K)aitlins!

Fellow UVM alums and colleagues: the two (C)(K)aitlins!

At the end of the work day. Work remains for the trained carpenters, but much has been accomplished.

At the end of the work day. Work remains for the trained carpenters, but much has been accomplished.

At the end of the conference: beautiful sunshine! Church looking great.

At the end of the conference: beautiful sunshine! Church looking great.

Christ Church overlooking Island Pond.

Christ Church overlooking Island Pond.

What have you been up to your in state?

Register for the 20th Annual Vermont Preservation Conference

islandpond

Registration is open for Vermont’s 20th Annual Historic Preservation & Downtown Conference, to be held in Island Pond on Friday May 2, 2014.

Highlights of this year’s conference include (see the full program here):

  • Hands on Hammers work day at Christ Church in Island Pond on Thursday May 1. Come volunteer, lend a hand, and help us get this 1875 Gothic style church on the mend.
  • Keynote Speaker Nancy Boone, Federal Preservation Officer, HUD
  • Preservation Awards
  • Four concurrent afternoon session tracks, two of which feature 30 min “TED” style talks about historic preservation, architecture (porches, railroad depots, modern architecture, Vermont architecture), community, funding, history, folklore, and more. The other two tracks offer guided tour of the National Fish & Wildlife Refuge or Brighton State Park Mid-Century Modern Architecture.
  • Closing reception.

Hope to see you there. The presentations will be great, and the shorter tracks will allow you to learn more, hear more and not feel fidgety sitting for a 75 minute presentation. (I’ll be presenting about Vermont’s railroad depots with one of my colleagues.)

Island Pond is a unique town in the Northeast Kingdom. Come see! And pack your snow shoes. (It’ll be May in Vermont, after all. Oh wait, it could be sunny and warm. You never know!)

Vermont Preservation Awards 2014

The 2014 Vermont Historic Preservation & Downtown Conference will be held on Friday May 2 in Island Pond. Part of the conference includes the Preservation Awards. Know of a good preservation project in Vermont? Now is the chance to highlight it. Read on for more information from the Preservation Trust of Vermont. 

PRESERVATION TRUST OF VERMONT NOW ACCEPTING NOMINATIONS FOR 2014 PRESERVATION AWARDS

Burlington, February 12, 2014 — The Preservation Trust of Vermont is now accepting nominations for the 2014 Preservation Awards.

Since 1982, The Preservation Trust of Vermont has recognized outstanding contributions in the field of historic preservation. Awards are presented to the individuals and organizations that have made special contributions in preserving Vermont’s historic architecture. Examples include the preservation or adaptive use of an historic property; educational and public information materials and programs; building trades and professional training; programming at historic properties; financial support; and special encouragement and leadership in the preservation field.

Nomination materials can be found on the Trust’s website [click here]. The deadline for submissions is March 4. Awards will be presented at the Preservation Trust of Vermont’s annual conference on May 2, 2014 in Island Pond, Vermont.

Award winners from 2013 and 2012 include: The Vermont Agency of Transportation for the Checkered House Bridge Project; Housing Vermont and Springfield Housing Unlimited for The Ellis Block, Springfield, Vermont; Larry & Lise Hamel for The Hardwick Inn, Hardwick, Vermont; the Town of Bristol for Holley Hall, Bristol, VT; the Putney Historical Society, Lyssa Papazian, Jeff Shumlin and Ming Chou for the Putney General Store Project; Birgit Deeds of Shelburne Farms, Patricia O’Donnell of Heritage Landscapes and Doug Porter of Porter and Associates for the Shelburne Farms Formal Garden Restoration Project; the Town Hall Theater, Inc. for the Town Hall Theater, Middlebury, VT; David Clem for the Wilder Center, Wilder, VT; Mimi Baird of the Calvin Coolidge Memorial Foundation, Plymouth Notch, VT; and the Friends of the Valley Foundation, the Wilmington Vermont Fund, FloodStock, the Deerfield Valley Rotary, Wilmington Vermont Flood Relief Fund, and Lisa Sullivan and Philip Taylor of Bartelby’s Books, Wilmington, VT.

The Preservation Trust of Vermont is a nonprofit organization founded in 1980 to assist communities and individuals in the ongoing effort to preserve and use Vermont’s rich collection of historic and architectural resources.

For more information, please contact Paul Bruhn, Executive Director, Preservation Trust of Vermont, 104 Church Street, Burlington, VT  05401, (802) 658-6647Paul@ptvermont.org or visit www.ptvermont.org.

Here is a video of the Shelburne Farms Formal Garden Restoration – a 2012 award recipient.