Abandoned Vermont: Brandon House

Please note that this house is for sale, not abandoned. But I cannot answer to how long it’s been for sale. 

House for sale can hold the appearance and aura of abandonment. Of course there are reasons for this. Perhaps a family member died and it’s an estate sale. Or it was a seasonal home, rarely used. This house in Brandon, Vermont gives that longing look, the look that abandoned or neglected houses carry. It strikes me as a house filled with relics of the last family to the live there; culturally interesting items, but not much that someone would want to truck back to his or her home.

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Aside from that modern garage door, the house maintains much of its architectural integrity.

White house in the white winter snow. The windows look dark and cold, and the house immediately seemed to have that abandoned lure.

White house in the white winter snow. The windows look dark and cold, and the house immediately seemed to have that abandoned lure.

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A beautiful ca. 1850 Greek Revival house.

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For sale by owner, the sign says.

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With a beautiful barn.

Cross your fingers for this house; all it needs is a new owner and some love.

Abandoned Vermont: Brandon High School

The trailer sitting in front of the high school adds to the abandoned feel.

The trailer sitting in front of the high school adds to the abandoned feel.

This 1916 building was constructed as the high school in Brandon, VT. It operated until around the 1960s, when the regional high school was built. Brandon High School has an owner (as all buildings do), with ideas of converting the building into condos/apartments. However, the building has been empty and neglected for many years.

Wouldn't it be nice to walk to these school doors?

Wouldn’t it be nice to walk to these school doors? Quiz: would you call this building Neoclassical Revival or Beaux Arts?

The front doors, closed and barricaded. Nice sidelights, transom, and details.

The front doors, closed and barricaded. Nice sidelights, transom, hardware, and details.

Looking through the front entrance.

Looking through the front entrance.

Cornerstone. 1916.

Marble cornerstone. 1916.

Brick details between the first and second stories.

Brick details between the first and second stories.

Side steps to nowhere. An addition removed?

Side steps to nowhere. An addition removed? Yikes.

That last step will get you. And note some deterioration on the door frame.

That last step will get you. And note some deterioration on the door frame.

Details.

Details.

View from the ground. The windows on the concrete foundation look into the (very deep) basement. The first and second floors were used as classroom space.

View from the ground. The windows on the concrete foundation look into the (very deep) basement. The first and second floors were used as classroom space.

The building appears in solid condition. Looking into the building the ceilings have been removed, but the joists remain. Old school supplies lie scattered on the floor. Some windows are broken, but overall, the building appears to have potential, despite being empty for decades. Sending good vibes to Brandon, VT. This building sits just outside the designated historic district and within walking distance of Brandon’s downtown, which is filled with shops and restaurants. If you’re traveling in Vermont, it’s a great place to stop. (I’ve had ice cream a few times in the ice cream & antique shop…and sat on the giant chair with my sisters).

Happy Halloween!

How about a pumpkin, a historic building and a historic barber shop in Brandon, VT?

Brandon, VT. The barber shop is on the right and has been in operation for 50+ years. It looks it, too, with original awnings, chairs, mirrors, sinks and other fixtures.

Have a great day, candy corn, pumpkin carving and all.

For years I’ve had people telling me to dress up as a flamingo. I have yet to do so. Maybe another year.  If any of you readers are dressed as a flamingo, please please send me a picture. Happy Halloween!

Preservation Photos #104

A worn marble step is a testament to the building's history and connection to the village of Brandon, VT. Isn't it amazing how mobility patterns emerge in our landscape and buildings?

Preservation Photos #103

The feet of an ornamental lamppost on the bridge in Brandon, VT on Route 7.

Details such as this one are often lost with rail, lighting and bridge upgrades due to time, efficiency and cost. Only one of these lampposts remains on this masonry arch bridge. It could use some rehab, too.

Vermont Roadside

Recently I traveled from New York to Vermont with my two youngest sisters, Sarah and Erin; we traveled by interstates and US  highways. As I’m talking about buildings Erin exclaims, “Is this a preservation trip? No one told me that!” With me, it’s always a preservation trip, Erin. But, as I discovered, they enjoy good American roadside culture just as much as I do, particularly giant roadside culture. And really, who doesn’t?

Erin & Sarah in Brandon, VT.

Me & Sarah in Brandon, VT.

Erin with the giant Dakin Farm Maple Syrup jug in Ferrisburgh, VT.

They may not be the biggest rocking chair (it did actually rock) or maple syrup jug in the world, but we were certainly entertained by them. And had we traveled by I-89 rather than US Route 7, we would have missed this entertainment.  And are we the only ones who think that the maple syrup jug should depict how many quarts would fit in there rather than 1 quart on the label?