Brookside Cemetery, Chester

‘Tis the season for cemeteries, foliage, and foggy days. Brookside Cemetery sits in the center of Chester, a picture perfect town in southern Vermont. It is a historic, intact, linear later 18th century to early 20th century Vermont village. The cemetery is located between the Chester Historical Society (the ca. 1881 brick schoolhouse) and the 1835 Baptist Church. Across the street is the town green and on the other side of the green is a beautiful, intact row of a historic buildings. Brookside Cemetery has been in use since the 18th century; the earliest headstone dates to 1770. In New England tradition, the burials face east and the stone lettering faces west. Even on a gloomy fall day, it’s peaceful. Take a look!

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Looking to the schoolhouse and the cemetery.

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View to the Chester Historical Society. 

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Headstones.

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The main entrance to the cemetery; this fence dates to 1867.

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The 1850 Public Tomb was constructed of granite block cut in nearby Gassetts, VT and transported by train to Chester Depot.

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The 1830 Hearse House is a museum as of 2017.

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The main entrance road is lined with cedar trees. The road was laid down and the trees were planted in 1867, inspired by the Mount Auburn (MA) Cemetery and the rural garden cemetery movement.

 

Interested in learning more about Chester?

  • Read more about Chester’s Brookside Cemetery here.
  • Read the Chester Village Historic District National Register nomination here.

 

Running into Fall

Evening running in the fall means I take to the streets and enjoy the neighborhoods instead of the bike path.

Last night was the first evening run for which I wore my reflective running vest (affectionately called the highlighter vest). Gone are my evening runs along Burlington’s bike path, overlooking Lake Champlain and the Adirondack Mountains of New York State. That route will have to be reserved for weekends. Gone are the simplistic evenings that require nothing more than shorts, a top, sneakers, and the Garmin for a run. Instead, I take to the streets of Burlington with my highlighter vest and another layer or two.

Over the past few summer months, I had forgotten how charming fall can be. The city streets bustle with college students back at school and tourists visiting for fall foliage season. The transitional weather means style will do, as long as you’ve brought along a few layers. Church Street remains busy, but not too crowded for a runner trying to squeeze in between the shoppers and restaurant-goers.

And the streets. I had forgotten how much I love running through the neighborhoods. The bike path might be my favorite place to run, but the dense streets always have a story. The sidewalks are less crowded and the setting is quieter. Now is the time to re-learn the hills, the good and troublesome sidewalks. With the evening setting in earlier, all of the houses glow with a warm, cozy aura. (It is also easiest to note which houses needed lighting overhauls. Lighting makes all the difference.)

Running in the dark is when I reacquaint myself with my favorite routes, favorite houses, and the idiosyncrasies of each street. It’s how I get to know and love Burlington so well. The crisp air is always refreshing and takes me back to cross-country memories, which I hold close to my heart.

Fortunately, fall provides a buffer between humid summer running and bitter cold winter running. While it feels like an end, it also feels like another beginning. New projects, new focus, new goals, new adventures. Bring it on, fall. You are the best running season, even when all of my weekday runs are in the dark.

What do you love about fall? Are you a runner?

Abandoned Vermont: Simonsville Meeting House

Churches and meeting houses and similar institutional buildings are so often neglected and used only sporadically as populations and congregations age, people move elsewhere and the community shifts. Sometimes the building no longer serves a purpose to the community or people favor a new building over their historic buildings. So it sits, awaiting use and suffers from the elements. The Simonsville Meeting House in Windsor County, VT is an example of a building that fell out of use.

Simonsville Meeting House in Windsor County, VT, constructed 1848.

Leaning steeple and roof repair.

Chipped and peeling paint on the clapboards.

Looking up from the back of the meeting house.

On the side of the building are large shutters over the top sashes.

View through the side windows.

Front door knob.

Closer view of the steeple.

Record shot.

The building seems solid and square still, assuming the roof repairs are maintained and the steeple is repaired. Anyone have creative ideas for an adaptive reuse project?

Flamingo-grams

Some recent Preservation in Pink adventures, including a flamingo wedding*! If you follow PiP on Twitter or Instagram these might be repeats, so I’ve thrown in a few new images. Where have you been lately? Anywhere fun? Do tell.

For a change of pace, more posts coming this weekend.

*I should clarify that by flamingo wedding, I refer to one of the “flamingo girls” who was married this past weekend in Virginia. We flamingos flock from all corners of the world to attend each other’s weddings. Congratulations Elyse & Adam!

Preservation Photos #56

A beautiful October view over the pond to the meeting house at Shelburne Museum in Shelburne, Vermont. What a great place for class field trips, even as a graduate student.

Happy Halloween

Addison Town Hall and Addison Community Baptist Church, October 27, 2010.

I don’t have a pumpkin to share or a haunted house, so you’ll have to settle for an October image of the Addison Town Hall. What a beautiful time of day!

First Day of Autumn

Ah, Autumn (or Fall, what have you)… it’s a perfect time for enjoying the landscape and appreciating your community. Cooler temperatures and falling leaves bring out a happiness with pumpkins, corn maizes, festivals, apples, hay bales, bright colors, cozy days, hot drinks, and people enjoying the comfort of their homes. Celebrate the comfort of your house today and the spirit of your neighborhood. During the weekend – find an apple festival or go pumpkin picking!

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