Touring Providence, Round One

The recent jaunt to Rhode Island included a visit with my preservation pals in Providence. Undoubtedly you saw the many Mr. Stilts photo pop up on Preservation in Pink. Instead of a flamingo invasion, here are some of my favorite sites along the tour.

Along the riverwalk in downtown Providence.

Along the riverwalk in downtown Providence.

Providence Public Library.

Providence Public Library.

I cannot take my eyes off this building.

I cannot take my eyes off this building.

Westminster Street.

Westminster Street.

Another view on Westminster Street, a great place to stroll, shop, get coffee.

Another view on Westminster Street, a great place to stroll, shop, get coffee.

Westminster Street, looking up. Rhode Island is ahead of Vermont in the flower count.

Westminster Street, looking up. Rhode Island is ahead of Vermont in the flower count.

Providence, RI. Another one of the beautiful buildings to catch your eye.

Providence, RI. Another one of the beautiful buildings to catch your eye.

New use of an old, hidden space: an outdoor movie screen. Creative use of a formerly underused space?

New use of an old, hidden space: an outdoor movie screen. Creative use of a formerly underused space?

To be continued.

Preservation is Good for Your Health

Mark Fenton, the keynote speaker for the Rhode Island Preservation Conference delivered one of the best talks I’ve heard. He linked public health and historic preservation, in a way that makes the connection seem so obvious. Read on to learn more from Mark’s conference talk.

Preservation is good for your health, plain and simple. Preservation improves quality of life, which likely includes health. Many of us know this, but have we thought about it enough to put it into words?

How is preservation good for you? Historic towns and cities were built for human scale, often prior to our auto-centric designs. This means that buildings are closer together, the streets are not filled with vast parking lots and strip-mall style setbacks. Streetscapes include sidewalks, street furniture, mature shade trees. Cars are not what connected people. Instead, people walked or rode public transit.

The problem with our auto-centric suburbs? Our transportation design and development patterns do not encourage walking (i.e. exercise). Every task requires a car. Bike paths don’t necessarily link neighborhoods to a downtown core. The destinations need to be functional, with the trailheads at our front doors.

The solution? Better design that allows passive exercise for all ages. Meaning that people are encouraged and able to walk for errands. Not every task requires a car. Networks are safe and user friendly. How? Vocal concerned citizens need to speak up and alert their elected officials that design matters. Their town doesn’t have to settle for the typical corporate big-box chain look. Schools should be built in towns, rather than off in the middle-of-nowhere. Zoning needs to change.

We need to stop building a world conducive to inactivity, and recognize that our historic development patterns made more sense. Telling people to exercise is not going to work. It’s like rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic. Instead, we need to change how we design, how we build.

Transportation design, building design, and community planning must be improved. Step up to the plate and negotiate. Make your community healthy and believe that your community deserves the absolute best, not the run-of-the-mill design.

Need smaller steps in your community? Add benches. Add shade trees. Buy a bike rack. Be an active role model. If you can, try walking for just one errand. Businesses are looking to locate in healthy communities.

Doesn’t it make perfect sense? Of course historic preservation is good for you. And that is another tool in our preservation toolbox.

Want to hear the entire talk? Watch it here – begin at 23 minutes for Mark.

Providence, RI. A healthy city block.

Providence, RI. A healthy city block.