Preservation Photos #213

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A vineyard with a historic farmstead in the background in South Hero, VT. The sun sets over the horizon, and the future looks bright.

The end of 2013 and the beginning of 2014 swiftly approaches. A new year brings a fresh start, a clean slate, and good reasons for taking on new challenges. We savor the good, reflect on the less-than-good, and do our best to bring our best selves into the new year. I love a new year.

What are your thoughts on 2013, or your resolutions for 2014? Wishing you the happiest, brightest, and healthiest new year.

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News: Instagram Posts & a Facebook Change

You’ve probably noticed a few picture posts on the blog over the past few days. In order to integrate Instagram (which is really only smart-phone friendly) and the blog, Instagram posts from @presinpink will now appear as blog posts. In other words, you don’t have to have an Instagram account or a twitter account to see Preservation in Pink adventures via photos. If you do follow presinpink on Instagram, you’ll see that not every photo will make its way from Instagram to the blog. This change allows for blogging in real-time, with a greater variety of posts.

This is accomplished using IFTTT. (Thanks to the ladies at histpres.com for the tip.) Basically, IFTTT creates “recipes” to send messages from one source to another. So it could be an Instagram hashtag (#presinpink) triggers a post on wordpress. Or it can do things like send you a text message when the forecast calls for rain. I’m fascinated by it.

In other news, the Preservation in Pink Facebook page will be removed beginning in 2014 for the purpose of simplifying and consolidating social media. Facebook served to only hold links to posts, and often it’s the last of PiP social media to receive attention. So, I thought I’d conduct an experiment and focus efforts on my preferred social media avenues (blog, Instagram, twitter). In a world of Facebook, maybe it will be necessary. But maybe not. For those who receive posts or links from Facebook, you can sign up for the RSS feed or emails. For communication, leave comments or send emails to preservationinpink@gmail.com.  And posts will still feed to Twitter. If you have a preference, let me know. I like chatting about social media, of course.

Ready to take off from JFK airport. This is a photo from the @presinpink Instagram feed that did not warrant a post on the blog.

Ready to take off from JFK airport, out of the Jetblue terminal. This is a photo from the @presinpink Instagram feed that did not warrant a post on the blog. Hope everyone had/has safe holiday travels.

What’s That? An HGTV Show That Will Not Infuriate Preservationists?!

While I’ve confessed my love of HGTV previously, most of the shows are not preservation friendly. What’s particularly annoying? The shows in which people talk about “character” and “charm” but only want brand new homes when they are looking at older homes. Or the shows in which spray foam runs rampant. I normally end up angry at the television. (It’s a good thing I watch HGTV only a few times per year.) But, wait! This time on my HGTV stint, I’ve discovered a new (to me) show.

The show is Rehab Addict, with host and “star” Nicole Curtis. She’s a self-taught DIY-er who buys historic homes desperately in need of rehabilitation. And what does she do? She restores them, doing most of the work herself. She saves old windows, hardwood floors, and significant features. And when new material is needed Nicole finds salvage material where possible. The show is based in Minneapolis, MN and Detroit, MI. How does she afford such tasks? Curtis is also a real estate agent; after the houses are rehabilitated she sells them.

As a preservationist, what do I like? Nicole seems genuine and she gets excited about finding historic features. She wants to save as much historic fabric as possible. She loves these houses. She despises vinyl tile, popcorn ceilings and bad renovation decisions. And she’s a cool woman. How many of us (women and men) wish we could do what she does? Read more about Nicole Curtis here.

While I’ve only seen a few episodes, it’s exciting to find a television that actually is about restoration not “remodeling.” Good job, HGTV. And now I want to buy a dollar house somewhere. Who’s with me?

Merry Christmas Eve

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Flamingos live in my Christmas tree.

Merry Christmas everyone! I hope you have time to relax, unplug, enjoy good company, and spend time around a beautiful Christmas tree. If you’re looking for some holiday entertainment, check out a few Christmas links.

The original 1966 How the Grinch Stole Christmas (watch the entire film for free).

The most recent dialect quiz from The New York Times. (Good family fun, avoiding politics and religion.)

 A photo of the first (1931) Rockefeller Center Christmas tree. (Have you been to Rockefeller Center?)

An O’Shea family Christmas tree (with my sister Sarah for scale, before we decorate).

Speaking of trees, did you catch the post on Christmas Tree sale typology?

A delicious cookie recipe: candy cane twists. (Always a favorite.)

Eggnog news story and recipe. (Yum!)

Past Preservation in Pink posts about Christmas.(Shopping to trees, carols, decorations, and more.)

Merry Christmas to you and yours. Enjoy the holiday. 

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Christmas on Ice

Five winters in, and this is my first Vermont ice storm. So far, most people seem to be spared. Almost one inch of ice blankets northern Vermont today, resulting from an ice storm that moved across the region over the weekend. Some are without power. Some are covered in ice. Lucky ones have snow. And some just have rain. The weather is crazy. On Saturday afternoon, the temperatures in Burlington and Montpelier (only 38 miles apart via I-89) was incredibly different – see below.

Saturday's varying temperatures. Not only is this is in reverse, but it's also extreme.

Saturday’s varying temperatures. Not only is this is in reverse, but it’s also extreme.

Freezing rain continued to fall off and on Saturday and Saturday night, into Sunday morning. Burlington and the rest of northern Vermont was one sheet of ice, especially my street, driveway, and front steps. Here are some photos from the ice weekend.

Every little branch remains covered in ice.

Every little branch remains covered in ice.

The front steps became a slide of ice!

The front steps became a slide of ice!

I had to chisel out my car...that is no exaggeration.

I had to chisel out my car…that is no exaggeration.

Even the flamingos were iced over!

Even the flamingos were iced over!

Eventually I made my way downtown for some Christmas shopping. Church Street is beautiful this time of year.

Eventually I made my way downtown for some Christmas shopping. Church Street is beautiful this time of year.

Christmas in Burlington.

Christmas in Burlington.

This week’s round of posting will be Christmas-y. Hope you and yours have fun days planned, safe travels, a warm house and no ice!

One Girl Scout + One Rosenwald School = Inspiring Youth in Preservation {Guest Post by Julia Bache}

While attending the National Trust Conference in Indianapolis, I had the pleasure to meet Julia Bache, a high school student who recently completed a successful National Register nomination as part of her Girl Scout Gold Award, and presented at the conference. She is delightful and quite impressive! At Julia’s age, I had not heard of historic preservation and here she is already writing National Register nominations. It’s so encouraging to hear high school students are interested in the field. I asked Julia if she’d be willing to share her story with Preservation in Pink readers. Below is her guest post. (Of course, I recommended the University of Mary Washington’s Historic Preservation program to them).

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By Julia Bache

I was so excited to meet Kaitlin at the National Trust Conference in Indianapolis a few weeks ago! I have enjoyed following her posts here on Preservation in Pink and am honored to share my preservation efforts with you!

Julia Bache and Kaitlin O'Shea in Indianapolis, pictured at a display in the conference expo hall.

Julia Bache and Kaitlin O’Shea in Indianapolis, pictured at a display in the conference expo hall.

At the conference, I spoke about the Rosenwald Schools and about how to engage youth in historic preservation. I also learned from other speakers and met many inspirational preservationists. Kaitlin and the other professionals showed me that historic preservation is something that we can always take part in, putting out talents and passion to work!

Julia presenting at the National Trust for Historic Preservation conference in  Indianapolis, 2013.

Julia presenting at the National Trust for Historic Preservation conference in Indianapolis, 2013.

As a sophomore in high school, I was ready to begin my Girl Scout Gold Award Project. Scanning the web for possible projects, I found a nomination form for a Rosenwald School that had just been listed on the National Register. Reading this form, I knew that I wanted to help preserve these endangered sites for my Gold Award project.

Buck Creek School, the subject of Julia's NR nomination.

Buck Creek School, the subject of Julia’s NR nomination.

 I decided to nominate a Rosenwald School in my area, the Buck Creek School. I began diving into the remarkable history of the Rosenwald Schools. I read about the builders of these schools, Julius Rosenwald and Booker T. Washington, and how they teamed up with so many communities to provide children with better education.

Julia conducting an oral history interview for historical research.

Julia conducting an oral history interview for historical research.

 I was amazed to find that over 5,000 Rosenwald Schools were built in 15 southern states, serving about one-third of the African American students in the south. They set new standards for African American education by providing nicer facilities, dedicated teachers, and a longer school term. I found it incredible that Rosenwald and Washington were able to break the racial barrier during the Jim Crow era to start this program and improve the education for so many children.

After writing the NR form, I presented the nomination to the Kentucky Historic Preservation Review Board. In March 2013, the Buck Creek School was officially listed on the National Register of Historic Places!

Julia's presentation at the Kentucky Historic Preservation Review Board.

Julia’s presentation at the Kentucky Historic Preservation Review Board.

I wanted to do more to educate the public about the need to preserve the Rosenwald Schools. As the second phase of my Gold Award Project, I created a traveling museum exhibition to share the Rosenwald Schools’ history. My traveling exhibition has been displayed in museums, historical societies, and public libraries across the state and will continue to tour into my senior year.

Julia in front of her Rosenwald School exhibition.

Julia in front of her Rosenwald School exhibition.

My project has taught me that people from varied backgrounds can come together through a common love of history and make a difference by preserving it for the future.

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Thank you, Julia. You are an inspiration; I hope there are many students like you. Readers, are you a youth in preservation with a  story to share (or do you know any)? I’d love to hear about your passion and projects.