A Train Station and a Fire Station

The fire station in Wallingford, Vermont is located in a the former train station, which is still located adjacent to the tracks. It’s quite the unique adaptive reuse. Take a look (those photographs were night shots, hence the blurry quality).

Note the station agent's bay on the left side, and the tracks in the bottom left corner of the photo.

Note the station agent’s bay on the left side, and the tracks in the bottom left corner of the photo.

The brackets are visible under the roof, a classic sign of railroad stations.

The brackets are visible under the roof, a classic sign of railroad stations.

Ramp access added. See the clear view of the station agent's window and the brackets.

Ramp access added. See the clear view of the station agent’s window and the brackets.

This photograph shows the most alterations in the conversion from train station to fire station. The walls were extended (see how the brackets are enclosed). The truck bays were added, and an addition for bays is at the end.

This photograph shows the most alterations in the conversion from train station to fire station. The walls were extended (see how the brackets are enclosed). The truck bays were added, and an addition for bays is at the end.

This isn’t the first time I’ve come across a non-traditional building turned fire station. Remember the Cavendish Queen Anne house that became a fire station with truck bays on the first floor?

What do you think of this one? The station remains in its historic setting and is still legible as a train station, though altered. The fire station is located in town. Residents know it was the train station and are glad to have both in town. Two simple improvements I’d suggest are (1) move the soda machine and (2) expose the brackets above the original door and transom. But, otherwise, it’s nice to see a town working with what it has to the best of its ability, and appreciating its history. It wouldn’t be eligible for a historic preservation tax credit, but that’s not always the point. Or is its integrity too far gone? Your thoughts?