Map in Need of Help

Yesterday my dad showed me a beautiful 1913 plat map of Forest Hills Gardens, which belonged to my grandfather, a long time of the Forest Hills Garden Corporation. My dad’s half of the family has long ties to Forest Hills Gardens, so the map means a great deal to us. However, it is not in great condition and could certainly use some help.

Linen paper map.

I believe the map is drawn on linen paper (but correct me if I’m wrong). See sections of damage in the pictures below.

Paper deterioration.

Cracks in the paper.

Damage in the center of the map.

As you can see, further deterioration will severely affect the map's readability.

I am not a paper conservator by any means or practice, and while I will look up solutions, I was wondering if one of you, readers, would have some professional or tried and true advice on how to deal with such an object. I also do not have a fortune to spend, so wallet friendly suggestions are helpful. I’d love to have the map conserved and framed. Right now it rolls up and stays in a cardboard tube, which I imagine is how my grandfather received it.

Readers, if you could help, that would be wonderful. Thank you! Let me know if you need larger images. I’ll get back to you with anything I find about paper conservation.

Preservation Photos #64

 

The Egyptian Theater in Park City, Utah, built in 1926, is an example of the Egyptian Revival Style. Photography courtesy of Linda O'Shea, November 2010.

Merry Christmas!

Christmas cookies are always delicious.

Why, yes, there is a flamingo in that batch of Christmas cookies. I am happy to be home with my family, ready to partake in our Christmas extravaganza: cookies, wrapping, Christmas carols playing, decorating the 12 foot tree, hanging stockings, drinking coffee, and all sorts of fun family traditions.

Have a very Merry Christmas and a Happy Holiday!

Merry Christmas from Preservation in Pink!

Preservation Photos #63

The start of the bobsled and skeleton run on the 1980 Olympic track in Lake Placid, NY. This same track was built in 1930 and used for the 1932 Olympics, too, but started a 1/2 mile further up the mountain. Today the athletes use a refrigerated track.

For more detailed information read the Mount Van Hoevenberg Olympic Bobsled Run National Register Nomination. Even pictures are included on this digitized NR!

Preservation Photos #62

The pin we receive (with the University seal) from the UVM Historic Preservation Program upon completing our degree requirements.

Friday Links

Rather than tell you about the remaining school assignments I have, I thought I’d find some interesting preservation links for you. Happy December! Happy snow!

Enjoy.

* Ah, Long Island, or ultimate suburbia as I call it. Fortunately, there are still some hints of its interesting past. I have no idea how I came across this blog, but Old Long Island features historic images of the great Long Island estates (think Great Gatsby style).  Some posts have Library of Congress images, some have real estate ads, others are from books and other printed materials; most are linked with images to Google Earth. Even if you do not have a Long Island connection, the architecture of these estates is beautiful.

* Sabra, over at My Own Time Machine, always finds interesting articles and current event topics. I love a recent post of hers about Historic Heidelberg – Kerlin Farm, located outside Philadelphia. From the post, this is the issue:

WHAT:   Now under threat of demolition, one of the oldest residences in Pennsylvania at 1050 Ashbourne Road, Cheltenham, PA.  The 300+ year old estate hearkens to the very beginning of European settlement in this region.  It would be difficult to stand in a place that more completely describes the settlement and growth of a particular place over the course of three centuries.  Now it is facing the wrecking ball.

Click through for more information. Be sure to read Sabra’s comment to mine addressing issues such as how much is too far gone, stabilizing ruins, and the education system.

* Route 66 News talks about an article that finds John Steinbeck’s Travels with Charley to be fiction. Personally, I could care less if it’s fiction. I love the book anyway. You?

* Are you an alum of the UVM Historic Preservation program? Check out the new HP alumni website. And come to the party on Saturday.

* This warrants a much longer discussion, but for now: the University of Mary Washington has a master plan to raze seven buildings including the historic 1931 Seacobeck Dining Hall. Seriously, UMW? Your historic preservation program is one of the best undergraduate programs in the country and you’re not going to take the advice of that department? Bad move.

* Actually, Preservation Nation’s Story of the Day feature often has stories about demolition threats. Yikes! (Not to be confused with that yikes!) Isn’t it time people got over the whole demolition thing? It’s not green, people.

* Christmas and historic mansions? Oh, how grand living that life must have been.

Shared with me, courtesy of Sabra, who found this on Etsy (via caramelos). If anyone has sent one the way of Preservation in Pink, I’ll love you forever (ahem, sisters). Just kidding! But they are adorable.

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Unrelated but worth sharing:

Follow my sister Annie O’Shea through the skeleton World Cup race series this winter.

Send thank you notes to the United States soldiers! (It takes about five seconds.)

A Life in the Trades: December 2010

Series introduction. October 2009. November 2009. December 2009. January 2010. February 2010. March 2010. April 2010. May 2010. June 2010. September 2010. October 2010. November 2010.

By Nicholas Bogosian

A Photo Diary of the Fall Quarter at Belmont Tech’s BPR program.

Metals class introduced us to the art of blacksmithing as well as the deterioration and preservation of various metals. Jeff Forster, guest instructor, owns a decorative ironworks and metal restoration business in Wheeling, WV.

The author at work.

Our Field Lab class in Morristown, OH gave us the opportunity to carry out sandstone foundation repairs. Improper face-bedding of the stone as well as the use of a Portland cement had caused some noticeable deterioration of the stone. The joints were repointed with an appropriate Virginia Lime Works mortar and one significantly damaged stone was given a plastic repair with a Jahn restoration product so that its cavernous face could be made sound again.

Jahn repair.

After Jahn repair.

In Windows & Doors class, damaged sashes and sills were removed from an 1880s one-room schoolhouse in Pleasant Hill, OH for repairs back at our lab space. Repairs included documentation of conditions, wood consolidation, paint removal, and re-glazing. Our final project was the creation of a paneled door with traditional mortise and tenon joinery and raised panels.

Graining & Marbling Class introduced us to the art of faux painting. Projects included sample boards of various stones and wood species. Final projects involved the creation of a “Pietra Dura” panel or stone marquetry as well as a panel with a graining and marbling combination.

And finally, my advanced material science class, which I elaborated on in my last blog, involved the conservation of structural timbers. Various techniques were carried out, including: splices/ dutchmans, WER (wood epoxy reinforcement), as well as mechanical repairs.

 

Carving out interior wood rot.

Splice/dutchman of knee brace.

 

BETA system repair to end rot using fiberglass rods and epoxy.

All photographs courtesy of Nicholas Bogosian.

Weekend Homework

One day soon I will not have anymore weekend homework, but right now I have two more weekends full until this semester (i.e. my grad school career) ends. And this weekend I’m back to the Addison Town Hall, one of my favorite buildings. This time I’m working on an interior conditions assessment (which follow a windows conditions assessment and an exterior conditions assessment). Take a look at these photos:

 

The second floor and the stage.

On the stage.

View from the stage.

 

These are only on the second floor because it’s the more historic of the floors… and it has the amazing historic feeling to it. Can you imagine putting on a play for your class on that stage? Look at those little desks. I love the benches, too, likely used for town hall meetings and grange hall meetings. While I chose a cold, but sunny day to conduct my documentation, it was colder inside the building than outside! (This, of course, I expected since the building hasn’t been heated in decades.) Still, any chance to spend time in the Addison Town Hall is a treat.

That’s my homework this weekend. What about you?