Happy Halloween

Addison Town Hall and Addison Community Baptist Church, October 27, 2010.

I don’t have a pumpkin to share or a haunted house, so you’ll have to settle for an October image of the Addison Town Hall. What a beautiful time of day!

Halloween Links

Happy (almost) Halloween PiP readers! Here are some fun links for your enjoyment:

Route 66 News has some great ghost stories to share: top ghost sites on Route 66 & The Ghost of the Painted Desert Inn. (Awesome posts, Ron!)

Old House Web‘s ghost stories from readers: The  Haunted Old Schoolhouse, The Haunted House in Dubuque, Iowa, The Mysterious Rocking Cradle, The House on Haunted North Hill, & A Fright at Winchester.

This sounds terrifying: Vinyl Preservation Society of Idaho. Aaaahhh!! (But it’s actually records, not vinyl siding. Phew. Got me there.)

Check out these British asylums.

In Burlington this weekend? Take a walking tour of Elmwood Cemetery with Preservation Burlington. Find them on Facebook, too.

In Southern Vermont? Check out the VINS Hoots & Howls event on Saturday October 30. Sure to be a good time for the whole family. Preservation – conservation – wildlife – all connected.

Or you could take a Ghost Walk of the Queen City (Burlington). Here are more Vermont Halloween events.

Or head to Mary Washington’s Ghost Walk in downtown Fredericksburg, VA.

Have fun!

Autumn on the UVM campus.

The Kitten Who Liked Measured Drawings

Previous Izzy appearances seen here, here, here, and here.

As already discussed, Izzy is no longer small enough to share my desk with me. This is what happens when I need the entire space for drawing and she decides to stage a coup d’etat. Thanks, Izzy. (If you’ve ever wondered, we think Izzy is part Angora.)

First, Izzy surveys the desk area.

Next, she gets a bit closer to my work.

She plays cute so I don't mind that she's all over my papers.

She likes to touch the pencils.

 

Pencil, notes, architect's scale...check.

 

And stretchhhh during all of this work.

Wondering what is taking so long...

Oh so tired.

And naptime.

 

Preservation Photos #55

On the double barreled covered bridge at Shelburne Museum in Shelburne, VT. Definitely worth a visit if you are in the area.

National Trust for Historic Preservation Conference: Austin 2010

Who is attending the 2010 conference in Austin, Texas this year? Straight from the National Trust, the theme is:

Next American City, Next American Landscape — looks to the future of preservation. Attendees will explore how preservation supports and revitalizes vibrant cities, maintains and restores our traditional landscapes, and leads the charge on true sustainability.

On one level we’ll focus on the conventional and controversial issues that arise in urban or rural settings across the United States; on another, we’ll examine all types of landscapes, be they cultural, intellectual, sustainable, tangible, or intangible. Our goal: to encourage conversation and interaction while spotlighting 21st century preservation imperatives.

The theme and the program sounds a lot like my favorite class, History on the Land. Texas will be so much fun, but unfortunately I will not be able to attend. So, readers, if you are attending, please take lots of pictures and share! And, wow, the conference even has a recommended reading list. Planning on attending virtually? Participate through the blog, Facebook, twitter, live sessions, readings, or even you tub.

Enjoy Texas, preservationists!

Reconstruction and the National Register

Buildings, structures, objects, sites, and districts are nominated to the National Register of Historic Places based their significance and integrity (of location, design, setting, materials, workmanship, feeling, and association) pertaining to 1 or more, of 4, criteria, which are:

A. That are associated with events that have made a significant contribution to the broad patterns of our history; or

B. That are associated with the lives of significant persons in or past; or

C. That embody the distinctive characteristics of a type, period, or method of construction, or that represent the work of a master, or that possess high artistic values, or that represent a significant and distinguishable entity whose components may lack individual distinction; or

D. That have yielded or may be likely to yield, information important in history or prehistory.

However, some properties do not fit these categories, for which there are criteria considerations:

a. A religious property deriving primary significance from architectural or artistic distinction or historical importance; or

b. A building or structure removed from its original location but which is primarily significant for architectural value, or which is the surviving structure most importantly associated with a historic person or event; or

c. A birthplace or grave of a historical figure of outstanding importance if there is no appropriate site or building associated with his or her productive life; or

d. A cemetery that derives its primary importance from graves of persons of transcendent importance, from age, from distinctive design features, or from association with historic events; or

e. A reconstructed building when accurately executed in a suitable environment and presented in a dignified manner as part of a restoration master plan, and when no other building or structure with the same association has survived; or

f. A property primarily commemorative in intent if design, age, tradition, or symbolic value has invested it with its own exceptional significance; or

g. A property achieving significance within the past 50 years if it is of exceptional importance.

Regardless of how you are nominating a property to the National Register, you must include a narrative description and a statement of significance, essentially making a case for the property. When you are nominating under one of the criteria considerations as well (a-g above) you must have a separate statement in which to discuss your argument.

I was thinking about the National Register eligibility of the Ferrisburgh Grange Hall in Ferrisburgh, VT (see comment by Sabra Smith) while at a square dance there this past weekend. The back story necessary for this is that the Ferrisburgh Grange Hall was just about to undergo a large restoration project in 2005, when it was burned to the ground by arson. Rather than start with a brand new building or something else, the town elected to move forward with a full-scale reconstruction. (Note: there is a much more detailed version of this story here and here.)

Ferrisburgh Grange Hall, after arson, 2005. click for original image.

While sitting on the balcony/second floor of the grange hall, I began to wonder if this building were on the National Register. (I do not know – do you?) And I wondered if it should be. By the definition, “accurately executed in a suitable environment…” it is appropriate. Though this building is not yet beyond the 50 year mark. (Note: there is not a 50 year rule. It is more of a guideline, but if less than 50 years it needs to be explained.)

However, while the building is beautiful, and accurate, and thoughtfully built… I do not feel as though I’m in a historic space when I’m in the building. The exterior can fool you for a minute or so as a historic building since it is an accurate restoration, but the inside is shiny, and incredibly clean and sharp, and just has the feeling of a new, modern, perhaps trendy building. I don’t mean that historically significant buildings have to be run down with peeling paint and scuffed floors, but feeling is such an important part; it’s the point and joy of standing in a historic building and sensing its history. Do you know what I mean?

But how you can deny the importance of this building? You cannot. And a lack of a National Register nomination doesn’t necessarily deny importance, but it indicates that the criteria do not fit this building at this time. So maybe this is the sort of building that will need at least 50 years in which to live and breathe with the community and to create its own significance, beyond that of a restoration.

I haven’t completely made up my mind. What do you think? Feel free to do disagree, of course.

The reconstructed Ferrisburgh Grange Hall, now the Town Hall. Click for original image.

 

Preservation Photos #54

Another image from the Ripton Country Store in Ripton, Vermont. The post office, still in operation, is located inside the country store.

UVM Historic Preservation Internship Presentations

You are cordially invited to the 2010 University of Vermont Historic Preservation Internship Presentations that will be held on Wednesday, October 20, from noon to 4PM in the Chittenden Room (room 413) on the top floor of the Dudley Davis Center on Main Street on the University of Vermont campus in Burlington, VT.

Presentations are scheduled as follows:

  • 12:00-12:15 Meghan O. BezioPhiladelphia Historical Commission, Philadelphia, PA
  • 12:15-12:30 Kate A. DellasRice Design Alliance, Houston, TX and Nantucket Preservation Trust, Nantucket, MA
  • 12:30-12:45 Emily A. Morgan, Planning and Zoning Department, City of South Burlington, VT
  • 12:45-1:00 Brennan C. Gauthier, New Hampshire Department of Transportation, Concord, NH
  • 1:15-1:30 Kristen M. GillottQueen City Soil & Stone, Burlington, VT
  • 1:30-1:45 Lucas F. HarmonCentral Park Conservancy, New York, NY
  • 1:45-2:00 Adam D. KrakowskiPreservation Unlimited, Montpelier, VT and Meeting House Furniture Restoration, Quechee, VT
  • 2:00-2:15 REFRESHMENT BREAK
  • 2:15-2:30 Kathleen M. MillerCultural Landscape Inventory Program, Intermountain Regional Office, National Park Service, Santa Fe, New Mexico
  • 2:30-2:45 Scott C. DerkaczCitywide Monuments Conservation Program, Parks and Recreation Department, New York City, NY
  • 2:45-3:00 Kaitlin J. O’SheaVermont Agency of Transportation Environmental Division, Montpelier, VT
  • 3:00-3:15 Jennifer H. Parsons, Woodstock Trails Partnership, Woodstock, VT and photovoltaic installation reviews under supervision of Liz Pritchett Associates, Montpelier, VT
  • 3:15-3:30 Sebastian Renfield, Pecos National Historical Park, Pecos, New Mexico
  • 3:30-3:45 Mary Layne Tharp, Historic Windsor, Windsor, VT
  • 3:45-4:00 Paul J. WackrowHistory Program, National Park Service, Boston, MA
The public is welcome to attend some or all of these graduate student presentations.

If you’re in the Burlington, VT area and would like to learn more about the program and the students, please come join us! If you have any questions, please contact:

Prof. Thomas Visser, director
Historic Preservation Program
207 Wheeler House
University of Vermont
133 South Prospect Street
Burlington, VT 05405
thomas.visser@uvm.edu

Kitten Edition

Actually, Izzy is no longer a kitten (as she was in her antics here, here, and here); her birthday was in September. She still loves me most of all when I have homework to do. Man, is she going to be bummed when I graduate in December.

She's very serious.

And she's absolutely adorable as she's lounging on my homework.

More Izzy-as-a-cat photos coming soon!

Friday Links

Happy mid-October! It’s a beautiful season of orange, red, and yellow up here in Vermont. I keep thinking this state just can’t get any more beautiful and then it does (I’m ignoring the rainy, cold weather today, though it is rather calming.)

Gazing over Lake Champlain to the Adirondack Mountains from Chimney Point, VT.

Friday Links hasn’t been around lately, so here are some I’ve seen over the past few weeks. Enjoy!

Have you thought about the extraordinary role women have played in Historic Preservation, far beyond “LOLITaS” or little old ladies in tennis shoes? Sabra Smith explains the term and delves much deeper into the subject. Be sure to check out the links on the post and in the comments for some great sources to projects about the history of preservation.

Still loving playgrounds? Of course. Have you ever wanted to design a playground or thought you had a much better idea for one? Well, here is your chance! Anyone and everyone is invited to participate in this contest, “Play For All.” (Found via the Playscapes blog — one of my favorite. Check out this awesome featured playground. To my sisters – who wants it in the backyard? Mom would love it!)

Do you love maps? Blankets? Sense of place? These map quilts may be absolutely perfect for you.

Another fashion-preservation related post, this one by Sabra Smith, who provided entertainment and education all in one! (See the comments — I’m not sure if I feel uncultured or just like a baby, haha. Thanks for the lessons, Sabra!)

Do you keep journals of your road trips or make scrapbooks? You should, because in 83 years, it might make the news like this 1927 journal and be an important treasure to us roadies or at least to your generations of grandchildren.

An early Ford Model T Factory needs help to become a museum. Support your American car companies! It’s a part of the National Trust Community Challenge contest.

Are you heading to the National Trust Conference in Austin, TX at the end of the month?

Talk about living and eating locally. This Burlington (VT) Free Press reporter is going to live off a CSA Farm Share for one year and blog about it. She sounds awesome and brave.

A scene on VT Route 22A -- I love that house.

Enjoy the weekend, whether you are pumpkin picking, apple picking, out and about, or stuck inside doing homework!