Where Were You?

Last night, about 11:30pm, CNN said that most people will always remember where they were when it was announced that Barrack Obama would be the next President of the United States and the first black president of the United States. And the record voter turnouts have been amazing.  Other countries have noticed a revived interest in voting from the Americans. It has been exciting and encouraging, opinions aside. It has been good to see Americans involved. From many angles, this election is different from all previous elections.

Have you thought about it that way? I hadn’t, but I don’t suppose it’s not something that I’d forget. So, will you remember? While all elections are historic, some are more historically significant than others, and this 2008 election certainly qualifies. Normally the media covers the “Where were you?” topics that are related to tragedy (John F. Kenneday, Martin Luther King, September 11) but this night just seems historic. It’s nice to have a positive memory to add into these universal categories.

Just something to think about.

Do you think that people in such historic times realize that they are going to be in important eras in the history books? Have people always considered such things? If we think about it more now than our ancestors, does this help us appreciate history and what could be historically significant someday? Or do we just become crazy collectors (of things, souvenirs, thoughts, etc.)?

Congratulations to our new President, Barrack Obama. And if you didn’t see it, Sen. John McCain had a very gracious and positive speech at the end of the night.

And here’s one more trip back to Independence Hall, where our founders proclaimed that “all people are created equal.” I think it’s important to keep various eras of our history connected. And now we have proven, as a country, that we believe the tenets of Declaration of Independence.

Independence Hall, Philadelphia PA

Independence Hall, Philadelphia PA

Independence Hall, seen from inside the Liberty Bell building

Independence Hall, seen from inside the Liberty Bell building

Proud to be an American

Proud to be an American

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