Abandoned Vermont: Brandon House

Please note that this house is for sale, not abandoned. But I cannot answer to how long it’s been for sale. 

House for sale can hold the appearance and aura of abandonment. Of course there are reasons for this. Perhaps a family member died and it’s an estate sale. Or it was a seasonal home, rarely used. This house in Brandon, Vermont gives that longing look, the look that abandoned or neglected houses carry. It strikes me as a house filled with relics of the last family to the live there; culturally interesting items, but not much that someone would want to truck back to his or her home.

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Aside from that modern garage door, the house maintains much of its architectural integrity.

White house in the white winter snow. The windows look dark and cold, and the house immediately seemed to have that abandoned lure.

White house in the white winter snow. The windows look dark and cold, and the house immediately seemed to have that abandoned lure.

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A beautiful ca. 1850 Greek Revival house.

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For sale by owner, the sign says.

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With a beautiful barn.

Cross your fingers for this house; all it needs is a new owner and some love.

Abandoned Vermont: Randolph Coal & Ice Shed

In the center of Randolph, Vermont, just down the tracks from the Randolph Depot sits the former Randolph Coal and Ice Shed, ca. 1920. The railroad is no longer delivering coal to Randolph, but the structures sit relatively intact and intriguing.

The building sitting trackside.

The building sitting trackside.

Looking to the Randolph Depot.

Looking to the Randolph Depot (on left). It sits in a cluster of buildings.

Randolph Coal & Ice is still visible on the shed.

Randolph Coal & Ice is still visible on the shed.

View on the other side of the building.

View on the other side of the building.

Two large wooden silos held the coal.

Two large wooden silos held the coal.

Coal chutes.

Coal chutes.

Conveyor systems of buckets carried the coal.

Conveyor systems of buckets carried the coal, which is still visible throughout this building.

A door allowed access above the silos.

A door allowed access above the silos.

The coal shed is adjacent to the side rail.

The coal shed is adjacent to the side rail.

The rail industry has changed in the past 100 years, but these buildings allow us to understand how important this transportation network was to our country. Whether carrying passengers, agricultural products, timber, coal, quarry products, it was the best mode of transportation at the time. For this reason, towns were often built around the railroad and associated buildings were located prominently in the centers of our cities and towns. Do these rail buildings have a use? It’s hard, as they remain in railroad right-of-way, and often must be relocated. What could a former coal be used for in a new life? Any ideas?

Abandoned Vermont: Brandon High School

The trailer sitting in front of the high school adds to the abandoned feel.

The trailer sitting in front of the high school adds to the abandoned feel.

This 1916 building was constructed as the high school in Brandon, VT. It operated until around the 1960s, when the regional high school was built. Brandon High School has an owner (as all buildings do), with ideas of converting the building into condos/apartments. However, the building has been empty and neglected for many years.

Wouldn't it be nice to walk to these school doors?

Wouldn’t it be nice to walk to these school doors? Quiz: would you call this building Neoclassical Revival or Beaux Arts?

The front doors, closed and barricaded. Nice sidelights, transom, and details.

The front doors, closed and barricaded. Nice sidelights, transom, hardware, and details.

Looking through the front entrance.

Looking through the front entrance.

Cornerstone. 1916.

Marble cornerstone. 1916.

Brick details between the first and second stories.

Brick details between the first and second stories.

Side steps to nowhere. An addition removed?

Side steps to nowhere. An addition removed? Yikes.

That last step will get you. And note some deterioration on the door frame.

That last step will get you. And note some deterioration on the door frame.

Details.

Details.

View from the ground. The windows on the concrete foundation look into the (very deep) basement. The first and second floors were used as classroom space.

View from the ground. The windows on the concrete foundation look into the (very deep) basement. The first and second floors were used as classroom space.

The building appears in solid condition. Looking into the building the ceilings have been removed, but the joists remain. Old school supplies lie scattered on the floor. Some windows are broken, but overall, the building appears to have potential, despite being empty for decades. Sending good vibes to Brandon, VT. This building sits just outside the designated historic district and within walking distance of Brandon’s downtown, which is filled with shops and restaurants. If you’re traveling in Vermont, it’s a great place to stop. (I’ve had ice cream a few times in the ice cream & antique shop…and sat on the giant chair with my sisters).

Abandoned Vermont: Manchester Inn

Manchester, Vermont is a popular high-style tourist destination with historic buildings, historic marble sidewalks, nearby recreation, shopping outlets – it’s picture perfect on so many streets. So you can imagine my surprise when I noticed this abandoned structure in the middle of historic Manchester.

On Main Street.

On Main Street.

I know I’ve driven by this building at least a few times in the past few years, maybe the fall day made its abandoned-ness more apparent. This was an interesting building. On the exterior it appeared that someone had attempted maintenance relatively recently. Yet peeking in the windows revealed peeling paint, water damage, and the usual vandalism inside. A sticker on the front door had a 2003 Conde Nast logo, so presumably the building had only been empty for a few years – likely not 10. It was weird. Check out these photos and see what I mean.

Marble sidewalks in Manchester.

Marble sidewalks in Manchester.

The view from Route 7A (Main Street) in Manchester, VT.

The view from Route 7A (Main Street) in Manchester, VT.

The property is much larger than you can see from the street.

The property is much larger than you can see from the street. Hmm, and a shallow roof pitch. That is never a good idea in cold climates.

A marble patio with an outdoor pool (not shown in photo).

A marble patio with an outdoor pool (not shown in photo).

The front porch.

The front porch.

On the front porch.

On the front porch.

Looking through the windows. It's amazing how much has deteriorated in just a few years.

Looking through the windows. It’s amazing how much has deteriorated in just a few years. If the first floor looks like this, what do the upper floors look like?

This takes "shuttered" to a new level.

This takes “shuttered” to a new level.

And the story? Well, the inn closed in 2009 due to foreclosure, and approved for demolition in 2011 by the Development Review Board. Recently purchased in 2013, the currents owners do not have a plan for the property. With its fate of demolition looming, the important questions will turn to documentation and infill.

Abandoned Vermont: Enosburg Falls Factory

The former Dr. B. J. Kendall Company factory sits boarded up and neglected on Vermont Route 105 in Enosburg Falls, Vermont. Enosburg Falls was put on the map when Dr. B. J. Kendall began manufacturing Kendall’s Spavin Cure in 1879. Spavin is a disease that occurs in livestock – a type of osteoarthritis that causes lameness.  Dr. Kendall’s business and the coming of the railroad brought this small, northern Vermont to a booming town at the turn of the 20th century.  The company operated until around the mid 20th century. Enosburg is still known for its dairy farms, and is designated the dairy capital of the world; each June Enosburg hosts the Dairy Days festival.

Front facade of the factory.

Front facade of the factory.

Central tower.

Central tower, showing original windows and details. The sign barely reads “Kendalls Spavin Cure,” but it’s still there.

Front entrance. Look in the front door and you can see original details and piles of stuff.

Front entrance as it looks today.  Look in the front door and you can see original details and piles of stuff.

Beneath the vinyl: beautiful clapboard!

Beneath the vinyl: beautiful clapboard!

Rear of the building: it appears that someone has done some maintenance work recently.

Rear of the building: it appears that someone has done some maintenance work recently. The roof looks fairly new and the cornice and brackets – up close – appear to be replaced.

Pigeons making themselves at home.

Pigeons making themselves at home. Original windows in those dormers.

Side entrance.

Side entrance.

In 2004, the Spavin Cure Historical Group started broadcasting a radio station from the building (note the large antenna on the central tower).  Vandals stole radio equipment in 2011, which put the radio station off air for a couple of years, but today the station remains on the air. The building falls into the category of not-really-abandoned, but neglected and in need of help, which is why it appears in this series.

Advertisement for spavin cure, courtesy of the Boston Public Library. Click for source.

Advertisement for Kendall’s Spavin Cure, courtesy of the Boston Public Library. Click for source.

Abandoned Vermont: Putney Schoolhouse

Schoolhouses are easy to recognize, especially one room schoolhouses that appear to have a bank of windows. This brick building in Putney, VT struck me as just that.

Sitting along the edge of the road.

Sitting along the edge of the road.

A stone wall runs along the property.

A stone wall runs along the property, up to the woodshed.

The front door.

The front door. And, look at the brick and granite.

The telltale bank of windows behind the plywood.

The telltale bank of windows behind the plywood, and rear windows for additional light. The windows appear to be intact, based on what little could be seen behind the plywood. 

Rear and side of the schoolhouse, more windows and a connected woodshed.

Rear and side of the schoolhouse, more windows and a connected woodshed.

The woodshed.

The woodshed, much less elaborate than the brick structure.

Two windows on this side.

Two windows on this side, and a good view of the slate roof. 

View across the road from the schoolhouse.

View across the road from the schoolhouse.

You can clearly see the potential in this building, even on a rainy summer afternoon. If you have information, please share.

Abandoned Vermont: Bloomfield Church

Bloomfield, VT is a small crossroads on the Connecticut River. Across the bridge is Stratford, NH. The general store is closed and not many houses populate this town. This church sits next to the town offices, the former school. Based on the piles of boxes in the windows, the church is abandoned or sorely neglected and used for storage. This poor thing has seen better days (note the missing steeple). The neighbors’ stuff is piled in the rear and on one side of the building, so I didn’t snap photos of all elevations.

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Churches seem to be common abandoned or neglected buildings. What can we do about these? Another topic for another time, perhaps.

Abandoned Vermont: Warren Mill

Found off Vermont Route 100 in Warren, this mill has gone through many reincarnations, and continues to be used today. (Editor’s note: the building appears abandoned from some angles, but the owner assures me that business is ongoing. It’s great to know a historic mill building continues with modern businesses.) A brief history of this site, from History of the Town of Warren compiled by Katharine Carlton Hartshorn.

Fire, as well as high water, plagued the mill business. Palmer and Wakefield lost a mill by fire. Henry W. Brooks lost his by fire in 1947 and again in 1949. And the Bobbin Mill originally built by Erastus Butterfield in 1878 burned down in the early 1930′s when owned by Parker and Ford. They began rebuilding on a shoestring in 1932, but fire struck again before completion. It was finally rebuilt and run as a mill for twenty-five years. Under the ownership of Barry Simpson and David Sellers in 1974, the Bobbin Mill was again damaged by fire. It was rebuilt and became the birthplace of several manufacturing businesses, including Union Woodworks, Vermont Iron Stove Works, Vermont Castings, North Wind Power Company, and Dirt Road Company.

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The mill showing damage and decay.

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Hunter Bobbin Mill appears on the exterior.

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The mill is composed of many blocks, likely additions from the various industries that have been located in the building.

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The Double Press Cornice Brake. Industrial archaeologists: who can shed some light on this one?

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The power source for operating the mill.

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Twin Motor Electric.

Another view of the exterior, missing a few walls.

Another view of the exterior, missing a few walls.

Around the corner.

Around the corner.

Lincoln Brook

Lincoln Brook Falls

Take a walk on the trail while you’re in the Mad River Valley. The water is blue and the rocks are worn from the falls, and even in the late fall, it was a peaceful (albeit chilly) place for a stroll. Note that this is private. Preservation in Pink does not encourage trespassing. Please respect the owner’s privacy and the business operating in the building.

Abandoned Vermont: Longmeadow Inn

The Longmeadown Inn sits quietly on US Route 5 in Wells River; 1832 on the sign refers to its construction date. Its hsitory is traveler based: inn, stagecoach stop, tavern, bed & breakfast. It’s for sale, so neglected is likely the more appropriate term than abandoned. But this building is included here because it has that historic & abandoned look about it, looking the same in March 2013 as it did in June 2012. Fortunately, it’s in good condition. Any interested buyers?

The inn's sign welcoming travels.

The inn’s sign welcoming travels.

A wide front porch for greeting and mingling.

A wide front porch for greeting and mingling.

The main brick block with ell and frame additions.

The main brick block with ell and frame additions.

Looking up at the weathered brick and granite lintels and sills.

Looking up at the weathered brick and granite lintels and sills.

Around back, the additions don't look any better. Note the array of fire escapes, too.

Around back, the additions don’t look any better. Note the array of fire escapes, too.

Another sign for the inn.

A view to the show the thickness of the brick wall construction.

A view to the show the thickness of the brick wall construction. Look at the distance between the two window sashes.

Fire escapes on the side.

Fire escapes on the side.

The building has a beautiful backdrop. The grounds have terraces that slope down to the river. It's easy to see why an inn would be situated here, amongst the beautiful Vermont landscape.

The building has a beautiful backdrop. The grounds have terraces that slope down to the river. It’s easy to see why an inn would be situated here, amongst the beautiful Vermont landscape.

Abandoned Vermont: Wolcott House

A house in Wolcott, Vermont sits on the bend in road, settled quietly and subtly into the landscape. Warm weather foliage hides much of its facade, but the colder months allow for improved views of the house. This appears to be another one whose owner/occupant began a significant renovation and have since stopped, for reasons unknown.

Wolcott, VT

Wolcott, VT

Wolcott VT

Wolcott VT – See the new basement foundation?

details, details

This house is full of architectural details & original windows.

front door

The doors and windows are secure and blocked. Someone still cares about this house.

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Looking up at the entryway.

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Side view.

windows & shutter

Original window, storm, and shutter in disrepair.

altered windows on the rear

Possibly a kitchen window over a sink on the interior. Maybe this window was simply turned 90 degrees (see the change in clapboard pattern).

side

Another view of the front and side, with the basement foundation.

interior view through broken window

Interior view through broken window. Organized and stripped, but work was ongoing at some point.

work underway once upon a time

Plaster ceiling, beadboard, stacked wood.

weathered

Weathered clapboard.

The house appears square and in good condition still; here’s to hoping its owners return.