Hardwick Stove Company

Some of the best things about historic houses are the antique appliances and lighting fixtures and bathroom fixtures… assuming that they operate safely and effectively. Our new (old) abode boasts such features, but right now my fixation is on the kitchen stove.

Gas and wood (or coal?) stove by Hardwick Stove Company.

It is made by the Hardwick Stove Company, but that is all I know. The house dates to the late 1920s. Looking at this picture: the right side has four gas burners, an oven, and a broiler at the bottom. The left side has a large compartment for wood (or coal?) with warming plates on the top. There is a Robertshaw temperature control on the exterior. The entire stove is cast iron. The hood does not go with the stove.

Does anyone know how to find a particular model name or number? I want to date it to the late 1920s/early 1930s, but that’s just a guess. Has anyone restored such a stove before? Is it safe? Is it expensive? My online searching has not been fruitful yet, and the Hardwick Stove Company is not mentioned often.

Can anyone pass along information about the Hardwick Stove Company? So far, I have found a bit of history from rekitchen.com:

A brand name that is now owned by the Maytag Corporation, Hardwick was once a company that produced wood cooking appliances and later gas and electric stoves for residential use. Hardwick stoves are no longer produced, but used or antique versions are still sold by individuals and specialty companies.

Hardwick’s History

The Hardwick Stove Company was started by Bradley Hardwick in Cleveland, in the late 19th century as a manufacturer of cast iron stoves. Control of the company stayed in the family, passing to Bradley’s son Joseph, who in turn passed it down to his son C.L. C.L. maintained control for the rest of his life.

During World War II, the company switched its production from stoves to airplane parts. In 1945, it resumed its production of stoves, with a new process of quality control. The next decade brought changes, as they began to manufacture electric stoves, as well. The company was finally acquired by Maytag in 1981, which later combined it with several other brands to form Maytag Cleveland Cooking Products.

I’d really like to find information about particular Hardwick models, as well as learn of successful stove restorations. Any help is much appreciated!

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6 thoughts on “Hardwick Stove Company

  1. Kate, this peaked my curiosity. This is a gas stove and range, probably from the ’40s or ’50′s — the left side compartment is a warming area/storage unit. Looking at some websites, I think you may be able to find the model number somewhere on the oven door, the frame around the oven, the lower drawers, back of the unit, or interior hinges. I searched rehabbing antique stoves on the internet and came up with a number of businesses that do it (many for a pretty penny), including one in Goshen, MA called the Good Time Stove Company.

  2. Pingback: More on the Hardwick Stove « Preservation in Pink

  3. I worked at Hardwick Stove Company in Cleveland TN while I was in college from 1957 to 1961. I believe that the stove pictured was made between 1958 and 1960. We continued to make the bungalow during this period and as I remember, most of them were shipped to Canada. I cannot remember the exact numbers but we made around 400 stoves each day and perhaps 5 or 6 were bungalows. I remember that they were extremely heavy in getting them on the conveyor at the end of the assembly line and getting them off to crate for shipping. The earlier model stoves had more rounded corners and I worked in the pattern shop when we developed the more square look about 1959 or 1960.

  4. i have a model No R3676w-49A ,Serial NO .444 Con.Sec No. 2010
    I wanted to know are they valuable of like do people collect this type of things. Because we might just recycle it and i prefer someone having it than being recycled.

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